Class Notes (836,153)
Canada (509,662)
POLS 3650 (66)
Lecture

POLS 3650 January 8th 2014 Research Methods II Lecture II.docx

4 Pages
121 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POLS 3650
Professor
Edward Koning
Semester
Winter

Description
th, POLS 3650 Research Methods II January 8    2014   Lecture II: Basic Mathematics & Levels of Measurement  ­ Basic mathematics o Fractions and decimals o Order of operation o Equation ­ Level of measurement o Continuous and discrete variables ­ Indexes and scales Fractions and Decimals (1/2) Decimal numbers examples: 0.3, o.25, 0.4 Fractions equivalent: 3/10, ¼, 2/5 The upper number is called the nominator the lower, the denominator  The dominator can never be 0  Nominators and denominators are integer: 1.5/5= 3/10  The fraction is expressed with the smallest possible integer numbers: 6/10= 3/5  Fractions and Decimals (2/2)  Calculating with fractions can be confusing ­ adding and subtracting= denominator needs to be identical o Example: 1/3 +1/5= 5/15+ 3/15= 8/15  4/5­ ½= 8/10­ 5/10= 3/10 ­ Multiplying: multiply both nominator and denominator o Examples: 2/3 * 2/5= 4/15 ­ Division: multiply by inverse o 3/4 ÷ 1/5= ¾* 5/1= 15/4=3 ¾ o Therefore we usually calculate with decimals Order of Operations BEDMAS ­ The order of operations determines in which order the calculations in an equation  should proceed: o Brackets: (...) o Exponents: 2 to the power 3 or root of 9 o Multiplication and division: 2*3 or 5/2 o Addition and subtraction: 1+4 or 7­3 ­ Sometimes brackets are implied by visual presentation o Look at slide: example signifies that you first add the two numbers and  then find the square root Equations (1/2) We will encounter many first­degree equations in this course, in particular: Y=a+ bX (Y= dependent variable, X= independent variable, a= intercept, b=slope) Equations (2/2) Some of the formulas are a bit more complicated example on slide ­Once values for n1, n2, s1, and s2 are known the example is doable. 1 Levels of Measurement (1/2) ­ Operationalization: identifying unit of analysis, indicators and possible values  (for attributes) ­ Example: o Concept: regime type, unit of analysis: country, indicator: type of  government leader, values: democracy, sultanate, republic, monarchy Level of Measurement (2/2) Four possible levels of measurement  ­ Level of measurement has large consequences for the calculations we can  meaningfully conduct ­  Nominal:  categorize: yes, rank: no, equal distance between values: no, natural  zero point: no o Meaningless numbers, the number does not represent a value. The  numbers are simply different from each other. ­  Ordinal : categorize: yes, rank: yes, equal distance between values: no, natural  zero point: no o Represent an order, or rank. Does not represent how much a number is  more than the next, for example: marathon runners are ranked from first to  finish and last to finish. The numbers do not represent that the difference  between 1 and 2 is the same as 1 and 8, etc.  ­  Interva : categorize: yes, rank: yes, equal distance between values: yes,  natural zero point: no o Assumed the difference between each value is the same therefore the  difference between 1 and 2 is the same as 7 and 8. More appropriate for  statistical research. However, there is no true zero point, examples: a  thermometer, IQ scale (no IQ of 0), etc. ­  Rati : categorize: yes, rank: yes, equal distance between values: yes, natural  zero point: yes o Assumed the difference between each value is the same (as above), but  there is a true zero point= zero represents nothing.  Level of measurement is a property of the operationalized indicator, not the abstract  concept: not the property of the concept we are trying to measure ­ Certain concepts don’t always have the same measurement o Example: political orientation/ ideology  Which political group do you feel most associated with?  Or rank your self between 1­10 as to how right or left wing you are o Therefore the concept does not define the measurement, the researcher  does. Continuous vs. D
More Less

Related notes for POLS 3650

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit