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Lecture

10. Persuasion Principles of Social Influence (Feb 11).pdf

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Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYC 2310
Professor
Saba Safdar

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PSYC*2310▯ Tuesday, February 11, 2014▯ Persuasion Principles of Social Influence▯ ▯ Methods of Investigation▯ - controlled experiment ▯ - main approach to studying any topic▯ - advantage: provides context fort addressing whether or not an effect is real and which theoretical account explains it▯ - disadvantage: eliminate other sources of influence▯ - participant observation:▯ - researcher becomes an observer and participant of the situation and learn the dynamic of the setting▯ ▯ Six Principles of Social Influence▯ - Robert Cialdini found that the key to successful influence is what we do before attempting to influence▯ - if there is no place to pause in a sentence, people are forced to listen to everything someone has to say▯ - 1. reciprocation:▯ - complying with a request of someone who has previously provided a favour▯ - study by Berry and Kanouse (1987):▯ - 2 questionnaires: ▯ - 1: keep $20 regardless of whether or not you complete questionnaire▯ - 78% response rate▯ - door-in-the-face technique (or reciprocal concessions procedure)▯ - -: $20 is sent after questionnaire is completed and sent in▯ 66% response rate▯ - living by the rule of reciprocity (Cialdini & et al., 1975)▯ - STUDY 1: ▯ - question to students: “are you willing to chaperon juvenile delinquent to the zoo for one day?”▯ - yes: 17%▯ - no: 83%▯ - STUDY 2: ▯ - question 1: are you willing to give 3 hours of your time every week for two years to juvenile delinquent?▯ - question 2: are you willing got chaperon juvenile delinquent to the zoo for one day?▯ - yes: 50%▯ - no: 50%▯ - 2. social validation (consensus):▯ - - want to know that other people share your view ▯ complying with a request if it is consistent with what similar others are thinking or doing▯ - constant drive to cpm[pare our thoughts, feelings, and behaviours with other people▯
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