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Lecture

SOAN 2111 Lecture Notes - Harriet Martineau, Lynn Mcdonald, Georg Simmel


Department
Sociology and Anthropology
Course Code
SOAN 2111
Professor
Linda Hunter

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September 12, 2012
Continuation from last lecture…
What could be so practical about looking at these older theorists?
1) all living in societies undergoing wide ranging social changes
2) each concerned with the character and direction of modern society (identify
and explain the core elements of society interest in themes division of
labour, etc.)
3) all were involved in the societies of their time
Marx - newspaper
Weber (pronounced Vaber) political activities
Durkheim socially involved (division of labour concept also encouraged
scientists to become socially involved)
Simmel (pronounced Zimmel) love, conflict, life
Harriet Martineau women’s issues (methodological contributions)
The Women Founders of the Social Sciences Lynn MCDONALD
Women:
- did not have the institutions men have had to support each other’s work
- excluded from universities
- no schools to promote their work
- few biographies
- their work wasn’t really publicly accepted – they were seen has secondhand
citizens
THE NATURE AND TYPES OF SOCIOLOGICAL THOUGHT: POSITIVISM,
INTERPRETIVE, CRITICAL
Positivism (based on observations and facts observable facts) is nomothetic it
seeks generalizable, universally applicable laws
- prediction and control
- logic of explanation ability to predict environments
- associated with functionalist theory
- Comte believe that social scientists must group the law that determine
human behaviour
Interpretive Theory study of society that focuses on the meanings people attach
to their social worlds
- human communication
- symbols are learned (we learn our gender stereotypes, etc.)
- relies on qualitative data
- understand limitations of positivist method want to predict control want
to recognize significance of historical and cultural context in understanding
human behaviour
- associated with symbolic interactionism
- interested in the meanings people attach to their behaviours
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