Class Notes (837,000)
Canada (509,985)
SOAN 2111 (130)
Linda Hunter (126)
Lecture

classical theory-nov 18.docx

6 Pages
102 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology and Anthropology
Course
SOAN 2111
Professor
Linda Hunter
Semester
Fall

Description
The French Revolution • destroyed the absolute monarchy in France • abolished the feudal system of serfdom • abolished special privileges for the nobility  • abolished compulsory church tithes and special privileges for the clergy • abolished imprisonments for debt  ­The massive estates of the nobility were broken up and the large land holdings of the  French Catholic Church (10% of the land in the country) were taken by the state  ­The French Revolution established the principals of governance that eventually lead to  universal male suffrage, equal liability to taxation, separation of church and state,  freedom of the press, religious freedom, the metric system, and equality of all people  before the law  ­In criminal cases – the right to a jury trial, the presumption of innocence, the right to an  attorney at trial and the right to a fair trial.  ­Napoleon Bonaparte (1801) – people turned to a popular general. He was crowned  emperor of France in 1804  ­Occupies Italy and Spain (1805­1809) ­Forced to abdicate and exiled to Elba (1814­1815)  Summary of The Enlightenment • reform causes  • belief in reason  • women share assumptions of Enlightenment rationalism  V The French Revolution: The Art of Politics (music, art, culture, romantic movement) Interesting Facts (just a little extra info for the context of the time) 1800s English Romantic Poets ­Wordsworth, Byron, Shelley, Keats Novelists ­Austen, Dickens, the Brontes, Eliot, Kipling ­Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm brothers collect authoritative versions of German folktales  and myth Science and technology 1800  ­Estimated world population nears 1 billion Europe at 180 million ­Volta demonstrates first battery and demonstrates electric current  1811  ­Invention of tin cans for food storage 1814  ­Steam locomotive in England used to power early railroad travel  1819  ­First steamship crosses Atlantic The Arts – during the Revolution  ­extraordinary flourishing state. A half century which includes Beethoven and Schubert,  the young Dickens, Dostoievsky, Verdi and Wagner, the last of Mozart, most of Goya Mozart  ­The Magic Flute ­The Marriage of Figaro Beethoven  ­dedicated his Eroica to Napoleon (3 rd Symphony)  ­Ode to Joy – 9 th Symphony ­Dickens wrote novels to attack social abuses ­Dostoievsky was to be sentenced to death in 1849 for revolutionary activities ­Wagner (composer) and Goya (artist) ­Operas – political manifestos – triggered revolutions ­Romanticism: around 1800 – was against the middle – it was extremist ­socially displaced young men  ­Classical spirit seeks order, poise.  ­Romantic – strangeness, wonder and ecstasy, personal feelings  ­Neoclassic 1775­1800 ­Romantic 1800­1850 (some say in music Romantic proper not until 1860)  French Revolution in Terms of Romantic Movement  ­Liberty, Equality, Fraternity  ­Sympathy for the oppressed, interest in simple folk and in children, faith in humans and  their destiny – all these so intimately associated with the time  • democratic character  • the romantic became intensely aware of nature, inner conflicts of man  • “I am different from all the men I have seen”, proclaimed Jean Jacques Rousseau. “If I  am not better, at least I am different”  • “Oh! lift me as a wave, a leaf, a cloud! I fall upon the thorns of life! I bleed!” (Shelley)  • the artist as bohemian emerged – shocked the Bourgeoisie  • Hugo dedicated Les Misérables to the unhappy ones of the earth  ­nineteenth century novel – conflict between the individual and society. Heathcliff, Anna  Karenina, Oliver Twist. ­Romanticism in Art: Age of Reason / Age of Passion Turner, Delacroix, David, Goya Romanticism in Music • gradual democratization of society brought with it a broadening of educational  opportunities  • musician had a palette comparable to the painter’s  • the rising tide of nationalism  • folk songs and dances of their native lands  • romantic man desired to taste all experience at its maximum intensity. He was enchanted  in turn, by literature, music, painting  • romantic composers responded  • romanticism as potent a force in music as it was in the arts  • composers expressed their nationalism in a number of different ways  • Chopin in his Mazurkas  • Listz in his Hungarian Rhapsodies  • Dvoräk in The Slavonic Dances  • Tchaikovsky’s – 1812 Overture  th  • national consciousness pervaded every aspect of the European spirit in the 19 century.  The Romantic movement is unthinkable without it  Ludwig Van Beethoven (1770­1827)  • Beethoven sympathized strongly with the American and French revolutions, which fed  his restless Romantic spirit  • politically charged pieces  • Symphony #3 Eroica – dedicated to Napoleon  • later Beethoven claims “He too is just like any other. Now he will trample on the rights of  man and serve nothing but his own ambition.”  • Symphony #5 Emperor’s Concerto  • Symphony #9 in D Minor “Choral” (Ode to Joy)  ­Beethoven gave it the setting of Schiller’s Ode – the emblem of its freedom and a  mainstay of its will to survive­ speaks to men and women of all complexions ­“Be embraced – ye millions”  ­Ode to Joy – “all men shall be brothers”  ­why the enlightenment is important sociologically (5 points to talk about : rationalism  etc.) The Romantic Conservative Reaction ­romantic conservative thinkers turned away from Enlightenment thought (rationalism of  18  century)  ­recognizing irrational factors  ­tradition, feeling, imagination and religion  ­great revival in poetry, art, religion  ­notions of the group, the co
More Less

Related notes for SOAN 2111

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit