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Lecture 6

SOC 2070 Lecture Notes - Lecture 6: Bulimia Nervosa, Laxative, Eating Disorder


Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOC 2070
Professor
Linda Hunter
Lecture
6

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WEEK 6 READING PART II: ADLER 279-290
CHAPTER 25: ANOREXIA NERVOSA AND BULIMIA
- current appearance norms stipulate thinness like any norms, entail rewards
for compliance and negative sanctions for violations
- fear of being overweight has led to a striving for thinness, especially among
women
- anorexics and bulimics exhibit distorted body images
- anorexia nervosa 20 25% loss of initial body weight occurs results from
self-starvation alone or in combination with excessive exercising, occasional
binge-eating, vomiting and/or laxative abuse
- bulimia denotes cyclical binge-eating followed by vomiting or laxative abuse
weight is normal or close to normal
- common physical manifestations include menstrual cessation or
irregularities and electrolyte imbalances, among behaviour traits are
depression, obsessions/compulsions, and anxiety
- bulimia affects 13% of college students
- overall mortality rate of anorexia nervosa is 6%
- as dieters, these individuals are conformist in their adherence to the cultural
norms emphasizing thinness
- slim bodies regarded as the most worthy and attractive
- women view themselves as visual entities and recognize that conforming to
appearance expectations and ‘becoming attractive objects are role
obligations
- pre-anorexics and –bulimics display notable conventionality as ‘model
children’, the ‘pride and joy’ of their parents, accommodating themselves to
the wishes of others
- parents of these individuals emphasize conformity and value achievement
- respondents felt that perfect or near-perfect grades were expected of them
- individuals who develop anorexia nervosa and bulimia are strongly attached
to their parents
- respondent’s reported their fathers’ preoccupation with exercising and their
mothers’ engrossment in food preparation
- among the family, body size became a matter of ‘friendly rivalry’
Primary Deviance
- dieters failed to maintain their lowered weights
- many cited their lack of wil-power to eat only restricted foods
- primary inducement for both eating adaptations was the drive for slimness:
with slimness came more self-respect and a feeling of superiority over
‘unsuccessful dieters’
- primary deviance refers to a transitory period of norm violations which do
not affect an individual’s self-concept or performance of social roles
- anorexics’ families and friends describing them as ‘well-groomed’, ‘neat’,
‘fashionable’, and ‘victorious’.
o Not until emaciation did some parents or fiends become concerned
and stop the praise
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