SOC 2760 Lecture 4: SOC PSYCH:PHIL DISCUSSIONS

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13 Feb 2017
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Think about yourself. Describe your characteristics. Explain how you came to
become
the person you call yourself. Identify any positive self-illusions you might have
and list some examples. Do the values of your culture have a role in defining
yourself? (January 23rd27th, 2017)
II.First, identify your attitude toward an issue (e.g., the environment, sexual
orientation/activities, alcohol/food/animal rights, etc.). Second, compare and
contrast your attitudes with attitudes of people either from a different or from the
same culture. Third, discuss these differences in terms of the values in these
cultures (e.g.,
individualism/collectivism, urban/rural characteristics, income, etc.).(March 6th
10, 2017)
III.Reflect on your learning process and what you found useful and not so useful
in this course. Note that you should reflect on the course learning outcomes and
comment if the lecture and the assignments helped you to achieve the learning
outcomes. (April 3rd-7th, 2017)
I am like most people in the sense that I am both introverted and extraverted, although I am more introverted at times I like
to spend my time going for a walk or listening to some music. However, depending on who I'm with I can be outgoing, loud
and sociable. As the professor mentioned and as I've learned in other classes situational factors can effect one's personality.
This applied to me very much as I can be two completely different people around my parents vs friends.
My sense of self is influenced more by my friends than my family since I feel I am more myself among them; due to how they
interact I see myself as funny (sometimes), loud (when there’s something I’m excited about), clean and likes to clean other
peoples’ rooms and always on time and (very) patient due to me always waiting for others to get ready. I can be very easy
going (on the outside) but am usually always worried about something, I tend not to show my feelings or even share it
unless I really need to. I choose friends wisely and keep only 3-5 close ones. I like being in smaller groups better, however
being in large groups of people who share the same interests (such as at concerts or community events where everyone is
gathered for one cause). I think that’s related to me being introverted but at the same time a normal human being who needs
some social interaction.
A positive self-illusion I have (and often am surprised about) is my ability to look at people as equal and not judge by past
experiences or actions. I used to be very judgmental and part of that was due to my conservative Catholic family, I didn’t
always see being gay as a normal thing. I used to think it was a sin but as I grew and made new friends and had new
experiences I realized that judging a person leads to a sheltered life. While I am still religious and still go to church my views
on certain beliefs have changed. I also think that moving to Canada (even though I was only 6) was a huge factor in why I
became more accepting. Canada has different cultural values and norms from India (where I was before). If I had stayed in
India, I might still believe that being gay is a sin. I think Canada being so diverse and accepting rubbed off on me and I
conformed with the social norms and values of a new country.
Self-discrepancy theory is one that I believe in because I do want to see myself as patient, caring, friendly and at the same
time outgoing but can be alone when I want to. These few characteristics are somewhat how I see myself but at the same
time there are flaws that I fail to notice or point out. I can be almost too quiet at times where I don’t ask many questions or I
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can be too friendly and often get used and manipulated. As mentioned in lecture people want to have more positive self-
illusion of themselves in order to get through life. My values and beliefs changed over time due to age and culture
differences. I often find myself thinking that if I didn’t get an opportunity to move to a different country and make new friends
I wouldn’t be the person I am today.
Sanderson, C.A. & Safdar, S (2012). Social psychology (first Canadian edition). Mississauga: John Wiley & Sons Canada
I don't like Shelia Copps' political platform. After all, she is from Hamilton.
i. Personal experience
ii. Accept claims by someone we know & trust and who is an authority on the
sort of claim we are evaluating
iii. Accept claims by reputable authorities (on areas of relevance to the claim).
iv. Accept a claim put forward by a reputable journal or reference source
v. Accept claims from reliable media sources without motive to mislead
vi. Fallacy: Accepting premises because you accept the conclusion
vii. Fallacy: Appeal to authority
viii. Fallacy: Mistaking the person for the claim or argument
ix. Fallacy: Appeal to common practice
x. Fallacy: Appeal to common belief
Question 2
1 / 1 point
More than 60% of the students at Harvard receive financial support. I read this in the Chronicle of Higher
Education.
i. Personal experience
ii. Accept claims by someone we know & trust and who is an authority on the
sort of claim we are evaluating
iii. Accept claims by reputable authorities (on areas of relevance to the claim).
iv. Accept a claim put forward by a reputable journal or reference source
v. Accept claims from reliable media sources without motive to mislead
vi. Fallacy: Accepting premises because you accept the conclusion
vii. Fallacy: Appeal to authority
viii. Fallacy: Mistaking the person for the claim or argument
ix. Fallacy: Appeal to common practice
x. Fallacy: Appeal to common belief
Question 3
1 / 1 point
I was sure that a right turn is permitted after a stop at a red light. But the policeman said it wasn't. I'm going to
fight this ticket.
i. Personal experience
ii. Accept claims by someone we know & trust and who is an authority on the
sort of claim we are evaluating
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iii. Accept claims by reputable authorities (on areas of relevance to the claim).
iv. Accept a claim put forward by a reputable journal or reference source
v. Accept claims from reliable media sources without motive to mislead
vi. Fallacy: Accepting premises because you accept the conclusion
vii. Fallacy: Appeal to authority
viii. Fallacy: Mistaking the person for the claim or argument
ix. Fallacy: Appeal to common practice
x. Fallacy: Appeal to common belief
Question 4
1 / 1 point
Running a red light isn't a big deal. Everyone does it.
i. Personal experience
ii. Accept claims by someone we know & trust and who is an authority on the
sort of claim we are evaluating
iii. Accept claims by reputable authorities (on areas of relevance to the claim).
iv. Accept a claim put forward by a reputable journal or reference source
v. Accept claims from reliable media sources without motive to mislead
vi. Fallacy: Accepting premises because you accept the conclusion
vii. Fallacy: Appeal to authority
viii. Fallacy: Mistaking the person for the claim or argument
ix. Fallacy: Appeal to common practice
x. Fallacy: Appeal to common belief
Question 5
0 / 1 point
The Cosmopolitan quiz made it clear that I have to leave Dilbert and find a more compatible mate.
i. Personal experience
ii. Accept claims by someone we know & trust and who is an authority on the
sort of claim we are evaluating
iii. Accept claims by reputable authorities (on areas of relevance to the claim).
iv. Accept a claim put forward by a reputable journal or reference source
v. Accept claims from reliable media sources without motive to mislead
vi. Fallacy: Accepting premises because you accept the conclusion
vii. Fallacy: Appeal to authority
viii. Fallacy: Mistaking the person for the claim or argument
ix. Fallacy: Appeal to common practice
x. Fallacy: Appeal to common belief
Question 6
0 / 1 point
No way I'll eat spinach anymore. My dermatologist said it will make my face break out.
i. Personal experience
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