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Lecture 1

ENG 110 Lecture 1: English 110


Department
English
Course Code
ENG 110
Professor
William Bartley
Lecture
1

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English 110 Y1S2
Story of an Hour- Imagery & Irony
http://www.vcu.edu/engweb/webtexts/hour/
Window- recurring visual image, she feels freedom from her marriage while looking out
the window
Dogrib Midnight Runners- Richard Van Camp (Adar)
https://bblearn.usask.ca/bbcswebdav/pid-1488201-dt-content-rid-
7442950_2/courses/82012.201509/Dogrib%20Midnight%20Runners.pdf
Setting- Masculinity, Fort Smith, trailer, Yellowknife, Slave River, community news
Imagery
o 1st Streaking: extroverted, spectacle
men find it funny, embarrassment/shame
women objectify
o 2nd Streaking: introverted, does it for himself
no longer sexualized, but aestheticized
Masculinity
o feels venerable, shame but also good, confident
Hypermasculine Indigenous Male Stereotypes
o Noble Savage:
romanticized and idealized, innately good, moral strength, close
oetio to atue, a’t suie i a ode old
o Bloodthirsty Warrior:
violent, aggressive, cruel, no moral code, justified colonization
Significance of the title & setting change?
What are some other differences between the short story and the film?
Why are they significant? How do they add/change to the meaning of the story?
How does the experience differ between the two?
Short story is original (authenticity, earliest)
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At the Lisbon Plate- Dionne Brand
Christopher Columbus- oppressor
The Drinker
o A personal history of difference
o A cultural history of oppression
Metaphorical embodiment of colonial history
o Characters oppress symbolically
o Because the drinker projects that symbolism onto them
Culmination of her cultural history
Dionne Brand Tiidad 50’s, Caada 0’s; she’s a stranger. Comes up in the story
he the aato etios The Outside – Caus – she is a poet and radical social
activist and lesbian feminist
Polemical (confrontational, controversial, combative) tone
every public or private gathering with white people is a arzoe
A woman at a bar getting drunk and spewing stories to the point we cannot distinguish
ealit fo he fatasies oe of the stoies is a essa uestio … “he is isae, she’s
speaking from the pain her culture has experienced (embodiment of history)
Elaine is the practical reason she ends up at the Lisbon Plate (the bar), it is in Portugal
(Portuguese involved in Colonial history) and she realizes this is the perfect place for her
to be because there is a statue of Chris Columbus which is important to her because
people are worshipping colonialism which she hates (likes it because she hates it so
much energizing rage)
Other energizing rages she listens to the old white professor, a big white boy, a big
Rosa (all embody colonial history) she imagines the big white boy as a slave holder and
herself as a victim of it; not just an analogy, she fully inhabits this.
She is deliberately and manifestly paranoid
Kamu story is an essay topic (read her side the Islamic man getting shot)
Soucouyant performs magic and tells story
Tectonic shift (earthquake) from the white person subjugating to other person (Lisbane
plate representing tectonic plate for cultural shift)
Characters operate symbolically as a metaphorical embodiment of history of the drinker
(main girl), she projects that symbolism on them (part of her cultural history). The
drinker (Elaine Zayir Africa) is a culmination of her cultural history
Does she actually kill them at the end
Squatter- Rohinton Mistry
Naia’s Noth Aeiaiss
o Clark Gable mustache- King of Hollywood
o Whistling- Rose Maie, Bidge oe the Rie, Coloel Boge
o Dal: Riiiiiiiight
“aosh’s A-tion
o Is faed  Naia’s diffeee foeig pesee, iigatio-related
pole
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o Frame narrative- Naia’s stotellig “aosh’s aatie pape
Acculturation
o Maintain group identity but also adopts features of dominant culture
George Copway- Autobiography
Life writing
o Autobiography (his life, his people)
o Biography (Generational continuity- traditions, belief)
o Memoirs (colonialism)
Colonialism- Weste eduatio, eodies his ultue’s histo, ad his
tasitio/oesio fo defiiet to eeed
Rhetoric of deficiency, deficient to fully realized
Conversion narrative
o Converted from Ojibway spirituality (animism)
o Uneducated
o Hunter to scholar and missionary
Ambivalence
o Ambi- both
o Valence- value
o To alue oth euall ad to do so at the sae tie
o Natue & iilizatio
o His accomplishments vs. his deficiencies
o His two names; English (George Copway), Ojibway (Kah-Ge-Ga-Gah-Bowh)
Bordertown Café- Kelly Rebar
Literal vs. Figurative Borders
Literal: economical, generational borders, Jimmy/father distance, Act 1/Act 2 (café
front/back), pass-through door, manhood, stationary/mobile in truck driving/crops,
past/present/future
Figurative: family, social, split in marriage (Jim/Maxine), Jimmy/father
symbolic/emotional border, language through the pass-through door, manhood,
home/away
Liminal Space: the café
National Borders
Canada: cultural mosaic
USA: melting pot
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