Class Notes (839,092)
Canada (511,185)
POLS 205 (35)
Lecture

Canadian National Identity and Political Culture

3 Pages
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Department
Political Studies
Course Code
POLS 205
Professor
Loleen Berdahl

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POLS 205 2011-01-11 Canadian National Identity and Political Culture Gzowski’s 1972 question - Famous Canadian radio personality - Often asked callers to “complete the sentence: “As Canadians as…” Federal symbols and policies - Some governments have signature policies and bills. - National Policy o Desire to have the railroad o Physically unite Canada  Important  Social security network  Evolved in terms of peacekeeping and internationalism  Evolved to encompass healthcare o Symbols  Most dramatic symbol is Canada’s flag  Canada used a British flag up until 1965  Timing is not a coincidence  Québec resented the idea of British flags representing Canada  Debate began on whether to continue being loyal to Britain o Trudeau: national symbols, national identity and national unity  Official bilingualism  Multiculturalism  Charter of Rights and Freedoms  Constitution Act of 1982  Policy is often used/created in his government  Idea behind official bilingualism was that it would be English and French from coast-to-coast - Entrenchment of Policy Symbols o Pros?  Political support o Cons  Alienation  Policy change  We do not identify change overtime - Challenges of Policy Symbols of National Identity o Not many people support the current activities of the army - Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Arctic Sovereignty o Harper has been pushing arctic sovereignty as a part of national identity. Do Canadians have strong national identities? - Canadian national identities are rather robust. - Canadians do identify with their country. How do Canadians define national identity? POLS 205 2011-01-11 - Growing diversity in Canada could ask: “with so many countries, what Canadian identity?” - September 11 could have an impact on attitudes, as well as the Québec referendum in 1995. Relevance of political cul
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