Class Notes (836,215)
Canada (509,690)
Sociology (204)
SOC 233 (31)
Lecture

October 7, 2011.docx

4 Pages
39 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC 233
Professor
Kara Somerville
Semester
Fall

Description
SOC 233 October 7, 2011 Functions of Family (Parsons studied Nuclear Family) Q – How does the family contribute to the maintenance of the larger social system? Q – In what ways is the social insititution of the family affected by its relationship to the larger social system? Positive Negative -Eufunctional - Dysfunctional -One parent (father) in workforce. -Two parents in workforce. Rearing of Children  Socialization; women can teach children how to be well-integrated citizens of society.  Teach them about their future social roles so they can function in society.  Regulate sexual activity; avoid sexual deviance.  Family helps to maintain social organization; parents will teach children social place.  Material (father) and emotional (mother) security. Functions of Family 1. Socialization – Mothers teach children how to be well-integrated citizens of society. 2. Regulate Sexual Activity – Avoid sexual deviance. 3. Material and Emotional Security – Father is material; mother is emotional. Note – It is through our family that we learn about race, class, gender, and all of these have certain placements; INEQUALITY IS FUNCTIONAL. Example – Parent/Child Relationships  How children and roles affect relationships within the family.  How do children affect marital satisfaction over the life cycle?  How do children help to promote relationships between kinship groups (i.e., grandparents, aunts and uncles, cousins)?  How do children contribute to and/or affect the relationships between families in a neighbourhood? Note – Review the slide on this. I only added the first three points/questions. Quick Review on Functionalism (thus far):  Macro (structural) – How institutions interrelate and function in society.  Function.  Interdependence and equilibrium – Maintain stability in society through slow changes.  Evolutionary change – Change is gradual and orderly; different parts (i.e., institutions) will slowly adapt to remain functional.  Structures – Social system is having needs in and of itself, not just within institutions.  Consensus – Norms and values; no conflict; nothing would function if we did not share these norms and values. Note – If you do not follow norms and values, there are sanctions put in place to maintain stability. Limitations of Functionalism  Reification of society and social institutions – Treating something like a “thing” (e.g., talking about things as though they are alive).  Tautological reasoning – Circular reasoning; a statement that contains its own proof (e.g., we know something is functional because it exists, and it exists because it is functional).  Cannot explain rapid social change – How do we explain  Implicit support for the political and economic status quo – We keep things the way they are because they’re functional; What about trying to eliminate the inequalities in society (e.g., race, gender)? Robert Merton  Functionalist.  Promoted middle range theories.  His Criticisms: Functional unity, universal functionalism, indispensability.  Introduced concepts “dysfunction,” and “nonfunction.”  Developed concept of deviance. Note- By bringing things to middle range, we are able to study things empirically; more empirically- supported. Merton’s Criticisms on (original) Functionalism: 1.
More Less

Related notes for SOC 233

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit