Class Notes (834,353)
Canada (508,492)
Biology (2,253)
BIOL 303 (134)
Bruce Reed (103)
Lecture

Study questions 3

7 Pages
117 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology
Course
BIOL 303
Professor
Bruce Reed
Semester
Fall

Description
Key Concepts & Study Questions for BIOL 303 (F2013) Lecture Set 3 & 4 (from  fertilization in set 3) Key Concepts (you should be able to describe or define these): acrosome  capacitation egg or ovum oocyte vitelline membrane  zona pellucida  cumulus corona radiata cortical granules ampulla types of cell movement during gastrulation: invagination/ involution/ ingression/  delamination/ epiboly  protostome deuterostome 1. In addition to the maternal genetic material, what else might you expect to find in a  typical egg cell?  In addition to the maternal genetic material, a typical egg cell might contain: • Nutritive proteins – long time before the embryo will be able to feed itself or  obtain food from its mother, early embryonic cells need a supply of energy  and amino acids, many species accomplish this by accumulating yolk  proteins in egg many of these proteins are made in other organs and travel  through material blood to the oocyte • Ribosomes and tRNA – early embryo needs to make many of its own  structural proteins and enzymes, and in some species these is a burst of  protein synthesis soon after fertilization, protein synthesis accomplished by  ribosomes and tRNA, developing egg has special mechanisms for  synthesizing ribosomes  • mRNAs – encode proteins for early stages of development, remain repressed  until after fertilization • Morphogenic factors – molecules that direct the differentiation of cells into  certain cell types are present in the egg, include transcription factors and  paracrine factors, many species they are localized in different regions of the  egg and become segregated into different cells during cleavage • Protective chemicals – embryo cannot run away from predators or move to a  safer environment, it must come equipped to deal with threats, many eggs  contain UV filters and DNA repair enzymes, protect them from sunlight,  contain molecules that potential predators find distasteful, yolk of bird eggs  even contains antibodies  2. In comparing mammalian and sea urchin development, how is the fusion of genetic  material (i.e. formation of the diploid zygotic genome) different in these two systems?  • In the sea urchin the sperm nucleus enters the egg perpendicular to  the egg surface, after the sperm and egg cell membranes fuse, the  sperm nucleus and its centriole separate from the mitochondria and  flagellum. The sperm’s mitochondria and flagellum disintegrate inside  the egg (very few sperm derived mitochondria derived from sperm in  developing or adult organisms), each gamete contributes haploid  genome to the zygote, mitochondrial genome is transmitted primarily  by the maternal parent, centrosome needed to produce mitotic spindle  of subsequent divisions is derived from sperm centriole, fertilization  in sea urchins occurs after second meiotic division, once inside the egg,  sperm nucleus decondenses to form haploid male pronucleus, once  decondensed, DNA adheres to nuclear envelope where DNA  polymerase can intitiate replication, in sea urchins, sperm  chromosome decondensation appeats to be initiated by the  phosphorylation of nuclear envelope lamin protein and  phosphorylation of two sperm­specific histones, sperm centriole is  between sperm pronucleus and egg pronucleus, sperm centriole acts  as microtubule organizing center, microtubules extend throughout the  egg and contact the female pronucleus at which point the two  pronuclei migrate toward each other • In mammals, the sperm contacts the egg, not at its tip, but on the side  of the sperm head, the acrosome reaction, in addition to expelling the  enzymatic contents of the acrosome, also expoes the inner acrsomal  membrane to the outside, membrane fusion between sperm and egg  begins, mammals, pronucleur migration takes about 12 hours, in  seaurchin it takes one hour, sperm fuses with numerous microvilli,  gluthaione reduces disulfide bons of protamines and allows uncoiling  of sperm chromatin, mammalian sperm enters the oocyte while oocyte  is “arrested” in metaphase of its second meiotic division, calcium  oscillatins triggered by sperm entry allow DNA synthesis and activate  another kinase that leads to proteolysis of cyclin, allowing cell cycle to  continue, mammals appear to undergo several waves of calcium ion  release, DNA synthesis occurs separately in the male and female  pronuclei, centrosome accompanying male pronucleus produces its  asters, microtubules join two pronuclei and enable them to migrate  toward one another, upon meeting, the two nuclear envelopes break  down, instead of producing  common zygote nucleus, the chromatin  condenses intro chromosomes that orient themselves on a common  mitotic spindle, true diploid nucleus in mammals is first seen not in  the zygote, but at 2­cell stage, sperm brings into egg not only  pronucleus but also mitochondria, its centriole, and a small amount of  cytoplasm, mitochondria degraded by the egg cytoplasm 3. Considering the general interaction of the sperm and egg, what strategies are used to  establish an inter­‐species barrier?  Species specific event #1  ▯The egg attracts the correct sperm by excreting  species specific proteins (For example, resact in sea urchins binds to  receptors on the sperm). This provides energy and direction to the sperm to  swim to the egg.  Species Specific Event #2 ▯When it reaches the vitelline envelope, the  receptors only bind to a protein that is unique to their species (ERB1  receptor on the envelope and bindin from the sperm). The binding is known  as agglutination 4. What is the consequence of more than one sperm entering the egg? How does the sea  urchin egg prevent this from happening?  When more than one sperm binds to the egg, there will be an incorrect  number of chromosomes and an incorrect number of centrioles. This will  lead to aberrant cell divisions with cells containing different number of  chromosomes than their neighboring cells. This will eventually result in the  death of the embryo.  Fastblock polyspermy  ▯a transient change in the electric potential of the egg cell  membrane. There is an influx in Na which produces a positive resting potential to  which the sperm cannot bind. This is quicker and faster response to after  fertilization.  Slowblock polyspermy  ▯is a permanent solution, where the cortical granules  (beneath cell membrane) bind to egg cell membrane and release their contents into  the space between the vitelline layer and the cell membrane. This modifies the ECM  between envelope and membrane. The proteins that hold them together are digested  and water flows in to increase the space to prevent sperm from reaching the  envelope. The fertilization membrane is created (starts forming at sperm entry and  makes its way around the egg). It removes any sperm that is attached to the egg 5. D
More Less

Related notes for BIOL 303

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit