GEOG233 Lecture Notes - Lecture 13: Waste Management, Massachusetts National Guard, Impact Assessment

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GEOG 233 – Lecture 13
Physical Tourism Planning
Case Study: Atlantic City, USA
Exploration & Involvement – 1850s – 1900s
white sand beaches, ocean, fresh air
Inward investment
1st commercial hotels constructed, boardwalk, railroad
Development
Continued in early 1900s
Expansion of tourism facilities, transportation
Consolidation 1945
Post World War II – mass tourism
Marketed to lower socioeconomic class
Case Study
Stagnation 1950s-1960s
Changed nature of tourist destination, crowding
elite tourists sought alternative destinations
Infrastructure deteriorated, pollution
Decline in tourist arrivals, increased unemployment
Outmigration 25% of city population, poverty increased
Revitalization 1970s
Turn towards gambling, casinos
By 1990s 5.3 billion USD invested
Employment 50,000 jobs in casinos,
50,000 in related industries
Ranked most popular destination in USA in 1990s
Physical Planning
“The process by which physical amenities supporting the tourism
industry in a particular region are identi=ed, planned, and delivered in
a timely manner.”
Infrastructure
Services and physical components that tourism depends on
Not usually provided exclusively for the tourists
Elements of Infrastructure
Transportation: Transportation adequate transportation to and
from destination and around destination, is ifrasture because
community uses, it is in place so that the community can
function. Transportation should be clean, safe scenic Air Sea,
ports, rail lines and stations, buses, roads, cars, how exceible are
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rrural roads, parking lots, maintence, gas stations, foot
transportation, side walks , walkways, trails
Power/electricity: Thermal, hyrdro, solar, nuclear,
Telecommunications: Internet, cable,
Water: how its collected, how its stored, how its treated, how is it
distributed, how often its tested
Sewage/drainage: how is it collected, how is it stored, out is it
treated, how likely is spill over and
Solid waste management: treatment, collection,
Public safety: healthcare, =re, police, emergency response,
pharmacies, jails, priority giving to tourist
Elements of Superstructure
Primarily created to cater to tourist, support services that tourist
require
Can’t have superstructure without infra
Accommodation: hotels, resorts, B&B , critical implications, were
its build, largest part of superstructure, one that dictates where
the rest of super structure is located
Restaurants: the restaurants that primarily for tourists
Convention facilities: meeting rooms,
Shopping facilities: speci=cally cater to tourist
Recreation services: travel agencies, tour operators,
Rental facilities: car, bike, motor cycle,
Who plans infrastructure?
Funded & planned by government (local, regional, national)
2 main reasons:
1) Bene=ts accrue to wider public
2) Costs – high cots
Private sector usually takes secondary role
Occasionally private sector takes on greater role: in newer
destination, might supply their own water treatment, waste, =re,
ems, public might give them tax holiday
Who plans superstructure?
Private sector
Most planning for tourism superstructure done as partnership
between private & public sectors
Private sector purchases/leases land
Determines tourism development needs & priorities
Generates tentative development proposal à reviewed by
government
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