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Lecture

Frankenstein.docx

2 Pages
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Department
Human Sciences
Course Code
HUMSC102
Professor
John Greenwood

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Romanticism:
Irrational, machine-moving you
Anti-Kant, Anti-Locke
Natural forces/ truth of nature
Science: “It‟s not just one lord”
Fairly environmental?
“Cloning debate” – where is the line? “the monster” “the daemon” “creation”
How would you like to be the experiment?
Deism
Electric spark of life
You can‟t dis-invent something
1. Classic Humanism story of you is you
- what happened to you
2. Christian Humanism you are what you want
3. Modern Humanism you are thought and doubt/certainty
Kant situational ethics aren‟t ethics
Locke you have to negotiate situations
Descartes I think therefore I am
Skepticism doubt what you see
Romantic Revolution:
Reaction against nationalism
Natural is moral, moral good
Authenticity, sensibility
Emotion prioritized over reason
“Sublime” – awesome power of nature
Solitude anti-classical
Evaluate:
Frankenstein‟s reaction to the being
Do you feel bad for the monster?
Do you sympathize with the monster?
Frankenstein isn‟t prepared for the response of a “son”
Experiment is no longer an experiment
Frank refuses to make him a wife
Reason
Deist
Nature
Frankenstein
Creator
Community
Rational science
Human
Horror
Conscience
Guilt
“Hell”
Destroy
Detached
Emotional empathy
Moral obligation
Murders:
William (brother)
Justine (maid)
Elizabeth (cousin)
Clerval (friend)
Father dies
Daemon
Created
Solitary
Mystery/emotion
Monstrous/outcast
Longing-inclusion
Resentment
“Hell”

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Description
Reason Deist Nature  Frankenstein  Detached  Daemon  Creator  Emotional empathy  Created  Community  Moral obligation  Solitary  Rational science  Murders:  Mystery/emotion  Human  William (brother)  Monstrous/outcast  Horror  Justine (maid)  Longing-inclusion  Conscience  Elizabeth (cousin)  Resentment  Guilt  Clerval (friend)  “Hell”  “Hell”  Father dies  Destroy Romanticism:  Irrational, machine-moving you  Anti-Kant, Anti-Locke  Natural forces/ truth of nature  Science: “It‟s not just one lord”  Fairly environmental?  “Cloning debate” – where is the line? “the monster” “the daemon” “creation”  How would you like to be the experiment?  Deism  Electric spark of life  You can‟t dis-invent something 1. Classic Humanism – story of you is you - what happened to you 2. Christian Humanism – you are what you want 3. Modern Humanism – you are thought and doubt/certainty Kant – situational ethics aren‟t ethics Locke – you have to negotiate situations Descartes – I think therefore I am Skepticism – doubt what you see Romantic Revolution:  Reaction against nationalism  Natural is moral, moral good  Authenticity, sensibility  Emotion prioritized over reason  “Sublime” – awesome power of nature  Solitude – anti-classical Evaluate:  Frankenstein‟s reaction to the being  Do you feel bad for the monster?  Do you sympathize with the monster?  Frankenstein isn‟t prepared for the response of a “son”  Experiment is no longer an ex
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