Class Notes (837,001)
Canada (509,985)
PSCI 264 (18)
Lecture

Week 7.docx

6 Pages
129 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
PSCI 264
Professor
Oleg Kodolov
Semester
Fall

Description
Week 7 10/17/2013 Fiorina – Chapter 10; Rourke – Chapter 11  Congress is bicameral – consists of 2 chambers. • Upper chamber – 100 members = senate. o 2 senators/state.  o Typically more difficult to have senators stay as long as the representatives in the  House. As such, Senate elections are more interesting. • Lower chamber – 435 members = house of representatives. Growing over the years. 1911  – limited the # of representatives. o Not written in the Constitution. Done every 10 years after the US census. Based on the  size of state/population. Even the smallest state is entitled to at least 1 member.  o Places more importance on internal organization.  o Democratic party controlled House – 1954­1994; 2006­2010 o Republican party controlled House – 1994­2006; 2010­now.  Now House has appeared more Republican. Speaker of the house – constitutional officer.   • Selected by the house majority party. o Decides who would sit on al house committees, chair them. o Speakers ruled. Controlled the floor of the chamber.  Majority leader – next in line to the Speaker. • Day­day operations.  Whips – group of around 24 members who serve as links between leaders and the parties rank & file.  Senate leadership is simpler than House.   VP is the president of the Senate. • Has Constitutional right to break ties.  Unanimous­consent agreements – all senators with an interest in proposals agree to them. Specify terms of debate. • o Amendments, how long they will be debated, etc.  Filibuster – lack the voters to win a floor fight, keep talking until the other side gives up.  Cloture – motion to end a debate. 60 votes required. • Problem: difficult to pass notions unless a party has 60 seats.  Rules committee – one that sets the rules that guide the debate, determines whether & when the   measures to full house of representatives to vote. • Decides the time allotted to debates.  Senate Finance Committee.1  Uninformed voters often choose candidates on the basis of party image & performance. • As such, members of parties are willing to tolerate constraints imposed by their leadership. • Members who receive campaign contributions from party leaders naturally feel some obligation  to support those leaders.  Most of the Congress work is done through committees. • Standing committees – fixed memberships & jurisdictions.  • Select committees – temporary committees created to deal with specific issues.  o Committees fall in 3 levels of importance: 1. Rules, appropriation, energy & commerce, and ways & means are highest.  The last 3 affects nearly everything the government does. 2. Second level deals with nationally significant policy areas.  Agriculture, armed services, homeland security. 3. Governmental housekeeping committees & ones w/narrow policy jurisdiction.   Veterans’ Affairs. • Parties customarily choose committee chairs based on seniority – longest continuous service.  Distributive theory – members choose committees relative to their districts. • Logrolling – membership gets first crack at legislation, other members of the chamber go  along with the committee in exchange for similar deference on bills they have shaped.  Informational theory – committees primarily serve a knowledge­gathering function.  • Members are uncertain about the outcomes that proposed laws will produce.    Caucus – groups of members w/shared interests cross party, committee & chamber lines.   Passing a statue requires going through 2 chambers, support of members of 2 political parties &  numerous
More Less

Related notes for PSCI 264

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit