Class Notes (834,244)
Canada (508,434)
Psychology (2,075)
PSYCH 101 (705)
Lecture

Research Methods and Ethics Lecture 4

6 Pages
68 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 101
Professor
Stephanie Denison
Semester
Winter

Description
Research Methods and Ethics 02/10/2014 Lecture 4 Empirical Research  ­ in order for something to be a theory it needs to be falsifiable  ­ what is not empirical research? You can have a theory but if you test it the wrong way; its not a theory or empirical research  The evidence: if its anecdotal or appeals to tradition  Problem: confirmatory bias, ppl tend to remember when things work out but don’t tend to remember the  times when things don’t work, ex; vitamin C  The Scientific Method Define the problem Observer the phenomenon  Form a hypothesis Test the hypothesis Analyze results Draw conclusions Share results  Correlational research Primary goal: to establish whether one variable is predicted by one or more other variables. Done with  variables that are internal or essential to the participant, for example gender, sex, etc. (variables that cannot  be changed or are unethical to change) Ex: does the amount of tv watched a week affect their gpa? (not asking them to watch a certain amount,  just asking them how much they already watch ▯ unethical to ask participants to increase amount of tv  watching etc. bc it could affect their school) The graph would be a dot graph, x­axis is gpa and y­axis is hours of tv/week Confounds: uncontrolled additional variable that may correlate with the predictor and affect the outcome.  Predicted variables are sometimes called criterion variables. One confound for example depression (causes  them to watch more tv and not focusing in school which affects gpa). Another variable that is there which  affects both of your variables. May or may not be aware of the confounds. Big caveat: you can never infer cause and effect. You can say that such and such predicts that this is the  outcome, but you cannot say A causes B, because there could be confounds that you are unaware of. The  result could also have an opposite affect, for example, your marks are low which causes you to watch more  tv because you give up Ecological validity: meaning its easier to study real life situations outside the lab.  Illusory Correlations Perceived correlations and not actual correlations. We think that a correlation exists based on random  observations whereas it doesn’t.  Examples: Crime increases when the moon is full Opposites attract  Stereotypes usually based on this illusory correlations  Experimental Research  Primary goal: to establish whether one variable is caused by one or more other variables.  Independent variable: the hypothesized cause. It is the thing that we are manipulating. The researchers  randomly assign participants to the different levels of the variables, while the researchers try to hold  everything else constant. Sometimes the independent variable is equally distributed among participants.  Dependent variable: the thing that we measure and don’t manipulate at all. It is the variable of interest.  Experimental research allows us to infer cause and effect. Rare that you find things that are the sole cause,  so can say that it is one of the causes.  Can sometimes create an artificial situation because it is difficult to take the experiment outside the lab  since you have to manipulate the independent var
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit