Class Notes (836,148)
Canada (509,657)
RS 110 (46)
Lecture

Medieval Christianity Middle Ages, Monastic Orders, Mystics, and Theologists

5 Pages
133 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Religious Studies
Course
RS 110
Professor
Peter Frick
Semester
Fall

Description
RS  110  –  001:  Lecture  11   Medieval  Christianity   Thursday,  October  21,  2010   Important  dates   • 410:  fall  of  Roman  Empire  (end  of  antiquity)   • 476:  last  Roman  emperor  is  deposed   • 500:  start  of  Middle  Ages   Medieval  Christianity   • 500-­‐1000  CE   • Clovis,  king  of  Franks,  became  Christian  in  496   • Charlemagne,  or  Charles  the  Great,  (742 -­‐814)  became  Christian,  converted  Europeans  (mass   conversion)   • In  800  Charlemagne  was  crowned  emperor  of  the  Holy  Roman  Empire  (despite  it  being   neither  holy,  nor  Roman,  nor  an  empire...)  by  the  pope  himself   • Religious  Rome  is  now  also  political   • Missionizing  of  Europe   • Christendom:  religion  and  culture   Middle  Ages   • Western  Europe  (Italy  and  west)   • Rome  –  Roman  Catholicism   • Latin   Byzantine  Empire   • Eastern  Europe  (Greece,  Turkey)   • Constantinople  –  Eastern  Orthodoxy   • Greek   Several  Developments   • Papacy,  monasticism,  mysticism,  crusad es,  scholastic  theology,  split  between  east  and  west   The  Papacy   • “You  are  Peter  and  on  this  rock  I  will  build  my  church.”    Matthew  16:18   • Latin:  papa  →  father  →  pope   • Ecclesial  and  theological  primacy,  authority   • Battle  for  power  between  popes  and  political  leaders,  emperors   • Pope  Boniface  VIII  (1294 -­‐1303)  issued  the  papal  bulla  called  Unam  Sanctam   –  One  Holy   (Church)   o We  declare,  we  say,  we  define  and  pron ounce  that  to  every  creature  it  is  absolutely   necessary  for  salvation  to  be  subject  to  the  Roman  pontiff.”   The  Babylonian  Captivity  of  the  Popes   • 1309-­‐1377   • Avignon   • Issue:  abuse  of  taxes   • Up  to  seven  popes  at  the  same  time,  three  main  ones   RS  110  –  001:  Lecture  11   • Pope  Boniface  called  for  help  from  France.  Moves  to  Avignon.  Wealthy  French  landowners   refused  to  pay  tithes.  He  kept  issuing  bulls,  so  the  French  decided  to  make  a  new  pope.  It   was  a  tie,  they  kept  both,  they  fought  and  added  a  third.  It  cleared  up  when  they  all  died. Monastic  Orders   • All-­‐male/all-­‐female  orders   • Monks/nuns   • Vows:  poverty,  chastity,  obedience,  celibacy   o Different  emphasis  for  different  orders,  but  these  are  general   Monastic  Orders   • Benedictine   • Clunic   • Cistercian   • Mendicant   • Franciscan   • Dominican   Benedictines   • Benedict  (~480-­‐550)   • Founded  order  in  529  in  Italy   • Famous  rules  of  faith   • Spiritual  exercises,  work,  study,  prayer   • Economically  self-­‐sufficient   • Missionary  activity  in  Europe   • His  sister,  Scholastica  (~480 -­‐543),  established  women’s  order   Clunic  Fathers   • Founded  by  Duke  William  the  Pious  in  910  near  Cluny,  north  of  Lyon   • Built  more  than  300  monastic  homes   • Church  in  Cluny  was  largest  in  Europe  (171m  long,  built  between  1080 -­‐1231)   Cistercians   • Reacted  against  the  wealth  of  Clunics   • Robert  of  Molesmes  (~1027 -­‐1110)   • Near  Dijon   • Trappist:  austere  practice  of  silence   • Thomas  Merton  (1915-­‐1968)   Mendicant  Orders   • Mendicant  orders  are  “begging  orders”   • Reaction  against  monastic  mentality  of  withdrawal  from  the  world   • Service  in  the  world   • Two  emerging  needs:  poverty  and  intellectualism   • Members  are  men,  women,  lay  people   o Known  as  “friars,”  e.g.  Friar  Tuck  in  Robin  Hood     RS  110  –  001:  Lecture  11   Franciscans   • Francis  of  Assisi  (1182 -­‐1226)   • Lived  in  poverty,  begging   • Known  by  his  simple  sandals   • Preached  to  the  sick,  even  animals   • Preached  to  Muslims  in  Egypt   • Prayers  of  St.  Francis   • The  “eternal  positivist”   Dominicans   • Founded  by  Dominic  Guzman  (1170 -­‐1221)   • Albi,  Southern  France   • He  preached  against  Albigensian  dualism  (light  and  darkness)   • Significance  of  good  doctrine   • Thomas  Aquinas  was  a  Dominican   Crusades   • Pope  Urban  II  –  s
More Less

Related notes for RS 110

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit