Class Notes (836,562)
Canada (509,854)
Commerce (703)
COMM 101 (34)
Lecture

Comm 101 9 - Oct 4 - Business Planning & Strategies.docx
Premium

10 Pages
109 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Commerce
Course
COMM 101
Professor
Jeff Kroeker
Semester
Fall

Description
th October 4 , 2012 CLASS 9: Business Plan Strategies What is Strategy by Michael E. Porter.  o Publication: Harvard Business Review Nov/Dec96, Vol. 74, Issue 6  Read here I. Operational Effectiveness Is Not Strategy • New set of rules: Companies must be flexible to respond rapidly to competitive and market changes. o Must benchmark continuously to achieve best practice.  o Outsource aggressively to gain efficiencies. o Nurture a few core competencies in the race to stay ahead of rivals. • Positioning – rejected, too static for today's dynamic markets and changing technologies. o Rivals can quickly copy any market position, and competitive advantage is temporary. • Barriers to competition are falling, regulation eases and markets become global.  • Hypercompetition – self­inflicted wound, not the inevitable outcome of changing paradigm of competition. • Failure to distinguish between operational effectiveness and strategy.  • Productivity, quality, speed ­ management tools, techniques: total quality management, benchmarking, time­based competition,  outsourcing, partnering, reengineering, change management.  Operational Effectiveness: Necessary but Not Sufficient • Primary goal of enterprise: Operational effectiveness and strategy. But work in very different ways. • Superior profitability: delivering greater value => charge higher average unit prices; greater efficiency => lower average unit  costs. • Operational effectiveness (OE) ­ performing similar activities better than rivals perform them; efficiency o differences in profitability, directly affect relative cost positions and levels of differentiation o E.g. better utilize its inputs by reducing defects in products, developing better products faster • Strategic positioning – performing different activities from rivals' or similar activities in different ways.  OE competition shifts the productivity frontier outward • Improve OE ­ require capital investment, different personnel, or simply new ways of managing. o insufficient­ competitive convergence­ is more subtle and insidious.  o The more benchmarking companies do, the more they look alike. As rivals imitate one another's improvements in quality,  cycle times, or supplier partnerships, strategies converge  o Result is zero­sum competition, static or declining prices, and pressures on costs that compromise companies' ability to  invest in the business for the long term. II. Strategy Rests on Unique Activities • Competitive strategy ­ being different, choosing a different set of activities to deliver unique mix of value. • Southwest Airlines Company – offers short­haul, low­cost, point­to­point service, convenient o Avoids large airports; Frequent departures with fewer aircraft; fly longer hours than rivals o Doesn’t offer meals, assigned seats, interline baggage checking, premium classes of service • Ikea – Swedish global furniture retailer, clear strategic positioning, perform activities differently from rivals o Ikea targets young furniture buyers who want style at low cost, in­store child care, extended hours o self­service model based on clear, in­store displays, room­like o low­cost, modular, ready­to­assemble furniture to fit its positioning.  The Origins Strategic Positions • Strategic positions ­ based on producing a subset of an industry's products or services • Variety­based positioning  ­ based on choice of product/service varieties, not customer segments; can best produce  particular products or services using distinctive sets of activities; meet subset of needs • Jiffy Lube ­ automotive lubricants, no other car repair or maintenance services, faster service at lower cost  • Vanguard Group ­ mutual fund industry; good, predictable performance and rock­bottom expenses.  o  Known for its index funds. Fund managers keep trading levels low, which holds expenses down • Needs­based positioning ­ serving most or all the needs of a particular group of customers (e.g. Ikea) • A variant of needs­based positioning arises when the same customer has different needs on different occasions or for different  types of transactions. • Access­based positioning ­ Access can be a function of customer geography or customer scale­or of anything that requires  a different set of activities to reach customers in the best way; less common o Rural vs. Urban­based customers • Strategy is the creation of a unique and valuable position, involving a different set of activities. o The essence of strategic positioning is to choose activities that are different from rivals'.  o If the same set of activities were best to produce all varieties, meet all needs, and access all customers, companies  could easily shift among them and operational effectiveness would determine performance. III. A Sustainable Strategic Position Requires Trade­offs • First, a competitor can reposition itself to match the superior performer. o E.g. J.C. Penney repositioning itself from Sears, more upscale, fashion­oriented, soft­goods retailer • A second and far more common type of imitation is straddling.  o The straddler seeks to match the benefits of a successful position while maintaining its existing position. It grafts new  features, services, or technologies onto the activities it already performs. • Strategic position not sustainable unless there are trade­offs with other positions – incompatible, more of one thing necessitates  less of another; pervasive in competition, essential to strategy o An airline can choose to serve meals­ adding cost and slowing turnaround time at the gate­or it can choose not to, but it  cannot do both without bearing major inefficiencies. o Trade­offs create the need for choice and protect against repositioners and straddlers.  o Trade­offs arise for three reasons:   inconsistencies in image or reputation;   arise from activities themselves. Different positions (with their tailored activities) require different product  configurations, different equipment, different employee behavior, different skills, and different management  systems.   limits on internal coordination and control.  • False trade­offs between cost & quality ­ redundant/wasted effort, poor control/accuracy, weak coordination. IV. Fit Drives Both Competitive Advantage and Sustainability • Operational effectiveness ­ excellence in individual activities/functions; strategy ­ combining activities o E.g. Southwest – rapid gate turnaround, strategy: well­paid gate and ground crews, no meals, no seat assignment, no  baggage transfers Types of Fit • Fit locks out imitators by creating a chain that is as strong as its strongest link.  • First­order fit is simple consistency between each activity (function) and the overall strategy. • Second­order fit occurs when activities are reinforcing. o Neutrogena's medical, hotel marketing activities reinforce one another, lower total marketing costs. • Third­order fit is optimization of effort.  o The Gap ­ restocking daily, thereby minimizing the need to carry large in­store inventories. • fit among activities substantially reduces cost or increases differentiation.  Fit and Sustainability • It is harder for a rival to match an array of interlocked activities than it is merely to imitate a particular sales­force approach, match a  process technology, or replicate a set of product features.  • Positions built on systems of activities (2 /3r order fit) are far more sustainable than those built on individual activities. •  What is strategy ? Strategy is creating fit among a company's activities. The success of a strategy depends on doing many things  well ­ not just a few ­ and integrating among them. If there is no fit among activities, there is no distinctive strategy and little  sustainability.  • Management reverts to the simpler task of overseeing independent funct
More Less

Related notes for COMM 101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit