Class Notes (974,125)
CA (573,756)
UBC (13,807)
FNIS (1)
FNIS 210 (1)
david (1)
Lecture 1

FNIS 210 Lecture 1: FNIS 210
Premium

by OneClass947954 , Fall 2017
8 Pages
90 Views
Fall 2017

Department
First Nations and Indigenous Studies Program
Course Code
FNIS 210
Professor
david
Lecture
1

This preview shows pages 1-3. Sign up to view the full 8 pages of the document.
FNIS 210:
What is Colonialism? Colonization can be defined as some form of invasion., dispossession and
subjugation of a peoples. The invasion need not be military; it can begin-or continue – as
geographical intrusion in the form of agricultural, urban or industrial encroachments. The result
of such incursion is the dispossession of vast amounts of lands from the original inhabitants.
- Colonialism denies human rights to human beings whom it has subdued by violence, and
keeps them by force in a state of misery and ignorance that Marx would rightly call a
subhuman condition.
The Colonizer and the Colonized:
- Published in French in 1957 in English in 1965.
- Contexts: height of National Liberation Movements, Algerian War, French
Intellectualism and Marxism.
How does Albert Memmi position himself? “I was sort of a half-breed of colonialization”
- Born in French Tunisia to Tunisian Jewish Mother and Tunisian Italian Father.
Preface: Touchstones
- Colonialism as relationality
- Colonialism as economics and more than economics
- Colonialism is dehumanizing
- There are neither good nor bad colonists: there are colonists.
Part one: Colonizer
- Colonial (small colonizer)
- Colonizer
- Colonialist
- Colonized
- Sub proletariat
*all colonials have privilege (pg.11)
- There is a sort of hierarchy established, more aligned with the Christian values
Privilege: A set of unearned benefits given to people who fit into a specific social group. It’s
a detriment to the colonized.
- 2 sides of the same coin:
the colonizer who refuses:
the colonizer who accepts:
Settler Colonialism:
- Settler Colonial Studies does not, should not, and cannot replace Indigenous Studies.”
- Franchise Colonialism: resources, and labour (subproletariat)
- Settler Colonialism: Land, elimination of the Native (assimilation, appropriation,
genocide)
- Lorenzo Veracini: Circle vs. Line
- Settler colonialism is different from other forms of colonialism in that settlers come with
the intention of making a new home on the land, a homemaking that insists on settler
sovereignty.
- Most important concern is land/ water/ air/ subterranean earth.
- Excess labour and primitive accumulation.
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
Post colonialism:
- Academic study that dresses the legacies of colonialism and imperialism.
- Homi Bhabha, Franz Fanon, Edward Said.
- Africa, India.
Decolonization:
- World War II
- Removal of colonizers
- Decolonizing the Mind
- It is not a metaphor
Settler moves to innocence:
1. Settler Nativism
2. Settler Adoption Fantasies
3. Colonial Equivocation
4. Free Your Mind and the Rest Will Follow
5. Reoccupation
Thomas King:
- Born in Roseville, California.
- Got a PhD in literature.
- Moved to Canada in 1980 to teach creative writing and literature
Violence of Borders:
- Travel Ban
- The US has an absolute sovereign right to determine who can and cannot enter the
country
Interpellation:
- Louis Althusser
- Ideological State Apparatuses (ISAs)
- Interpellation: how ISAs transform individuals into subjects of the state
Audra Simpson:
- Kahnawake Mohawk
- Professor of Anthropology
- Columbia University
Interpellation: The process by which ISA’s bring into being, or give identity to, political
subjects. (Althusser)
Simpson: Politics of Refusal
- “No”
- Affirms sovereignty and self determination
- Interrupts politics of recognition
- Consent
Where do we see refusal manifest?
- Direct action: sit ins, strikes, hacktivism, occupations, blockades, etc.
- Idle no more.
- Interrupts the smooth flow of settler capitalism.
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
Refusal in “Borders, Cigarettes and Sovereignty.”
- First Nations Status: percentage, blood, your parents.
- Citizenship
- State sovereignty
- Settler law
- Settler determinations of indigenous identity
- Sovereignty: settler sovereignty: “as dominion over a place and a people, more
specifically… (as) applied extraterritorially through... revenue” (141)
Jay Treaty (1795)
- The right to traverse the boundaries of the US- British divide freely and without levy
guaranteed for Indian people who were operating in what has been defined as their
cultural tradition ‘nexus’ of “trade” (133)
- Does not give rights to indigenous peoples
- Confirms and gives constitutional protection to those rights
- U.S and Canada have power to determine identity
- United States: blood quantum (139)
- Canada: “cultural practices that were in place prior to settlement” (31)
- Contemporary Contexts: November 2, 1998 Federal Court of Appeal holds that there was
an existing Aboriginal right for the Mohawks of Akwesasne, when crossing the
international border.
- Akwesasne: At Akwesasne, by reason of its geographical location on both sides of the
U.S. Canada boundary, border crossing is an essential every day event for the 13,000
Mohawks that reside here today.
The Indian Act:
- Canadian federal law governing matters pertaining to Indian status.
- John A MacDonald: “The great aim of our legislation has been to do away with the tribal
system and assimilate the Indian people in all respects with the other inhabitants of the
Dominion as speedily as they are fit to change.” – Matters of gender discrimination and
misogyny
- Winona Stevenson: “A nation is not conquered until the hearts of its women are on the
ground.”
- European ideals of womanhood (pg.46); public vs. private
- Commodification of Indigenous women’s labour
- Drudge/ Princess (pg. 47)
- “Righteousness of the patriarchy” (p. 48); woman as victim
- Indian Act; patrilineal system
- Gender Discrimination: way to address the legislation, gives status back: Bill C-31
(1985): 6 (1) or 6 (2), Bill C-3.
- Dory Nason paper: Notion of decolonial love, love can be a politic
- Residential Schools: Gave girls and boys distinct jobs to erase the gray area
Ethics: Indigenous Contexts
- Consent Prejudice
- Power Landscapes
- Privacy
- Respect
- Agency
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
FNIS 210: What is Colonialism? Colonization can be defined as some form of invasion., dispossession and subjugation of a peoples. The invasion need not be military; it can begin-or continue as geographical intrusion in the form of agricultural, urban or industrial encroachments. The result of such incursion is the dispossession of vast amounts of lands from the original inhabitants. - Colonialism denies human rights to human beings whom it has subdued by violence, and keeps them by force in a state of misery and ignorance that Marx would rightly call a subhuman condition. The Colonizer and the Colonized: - Published in French in 1957 in English in 1965. - Contexts: height of National Liberation Movements, Algerian War, French Intellectualism and Marxism. How does Albert Memmi position himself? I was sort of a half-breed of colonialization - Born in French Tunisia to Tunisian Jewish Mother and Tunisian Italian Father. Preface: Touchstones - Colonialism as relationality - Colonialism as economics and more than economics - Colonialism is dehumanizing - There are neither good nor bad colonists: there are colonists. Part one: Colonizer - Colonial (small colonizer) - Colonizer - Colonialist - Colonized - Sub proletariat *all colonials have privilege (pg.11) - There is a sort of hierarchy established, more aligned with the Christian values Privilege: A set of unearned benefits given to people who fit into a specific social group. Its a detriment to the colonized. - 2 sides of the same coin: the colonizer who refuses: the colonizer who accepts: Settler Colonialism: - Settler Colonial Studies does not, should not, and cannot replace Indigenous Studies. - Franchise Colonialism: resources, and labour (subproletariat) - Settler Colonialism: Land, elimination of the Native (assimilation, appropriation, genocide) - Lorenzo Veracini: Circle vs. Line - Settler colonialism is different from other forms of colonialism in that settlers come with the intention of making a new home on the land, a homemaking that insists on settler sovereignty. - Most important concern is land/ water/ air/ subterranean earth. - Excess labour and primitive accumulation. Post colonialism: - Academic study that dresses the legacies of colonialism and imperialism. - Homi Bhabha, Franz Fanon, Edward Said. - Africa, India. Decolonization: - World War II - Removal of colonizers - Decolonizing the Mind - It is not a metaphor Settler moves to innocence: 1. Settler Nativism 2. Settler Adoption Fantasies 3. Colonial Equivocation 4. Free Your Mind and the Rest Will Follow 5. Reoccupation Thomas King: - Born in Roseville, California. - Got a PhD in literature. - Moved to Canada in 1980 to teach creative writing and literature Violence of Borders: - Travel Ban - The US has an absolute sovereign right to determine who can and cannot enter the country Interpellation: - Louis Althusser - Ideological State Apparatuses (ISAs) - Interpellation: how ISAs transform individuals into subjects of the state Audra Simpson: - Kahnawake Mohawk - Professor of Anthropology - Columbia University Interpellation: The process by which ISAs bring into being, or give identity to, political subjects. (Althusser) Simpson: Politics of Refusal - No - Affirms sovereignty and self determination - Interrupts politics of recognition - Consent Where do we see refusal manifest? - Direct action: sit ins, strikes, hacktivism, occupations, blockades, etc. - Idle no more. - Interrupts the smooth flow of settler capitalism.Refusal in Borders, Cigarettes and Sovereignty. - First Nations Status: percentage, blood, your parents. - Citizenship - State sovereignty - Settler law - Settler determinations of indigenous identity - Sovereignty: settler sovereignty: as dominion over a place and a people, more specifically (as) applied extraterritorially through... revenue (141) Jay Treaty (1795) - The right to traverse the boundaries of the US- British divide freely and without levy guaranteed for Indian people who were operating in what has been defined as their cultural tradition nexus of trade (133) - Does not give rights to indigenous peoples - Confirms and gives constitutional protection to those rights - U.S and Canada have power to determine identity - United States: blood quantum (139) - Canada: cultural practices that were in place prior to settlement (31) - Contemporary Contexts: November 2, 1998 Federal Court of Appeal holds that there was an existing Aboriginal right for the Mohawks of Akwesasne, when crossing the international border. - Akwesasne: At Akwesasne, by reason of its geographical location on both sides of the U.S. Canada boundary, bord
More Less
Unlock Document

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

You've reached the limit of 4 previews this month

Create an account for unlimited previews.

Already have an account?

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit