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Reading Response W10 HIS 103.docx

3 Pages
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Department
History
Course Code
HIST 103
Professor
Jeffrey Byrne

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Nurul Hanisah Kamarul Zaman (18499129) Week 12 HIST 103 101 Strategic Bombing:An Effort to Minimize Casualties After the Little Boy and Fat Man destroyed most of the Japanese population in Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, the ethics of using a bombing method in order to end a war more quickly has, since then, become questionable. This is as a result seen from the use of the atomic bombs by the U.S. military force on Nagasaki and Hiroshima which have proven to cause a prolonged radiation and a strong magnitude of destruction. There are multiple ways of looking at the legitimacy to bomb cities in order to halt a war. By examining the bombing in Nagasaki and Hiroshima in 1945 by the U.S, it can be understood that the event was not deliberated by the U.S. However, it was a reactionary move to protect the U.S. from the Japanese military campaign in EastAsia when unexpectedly, the Japanese bombed the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. In this case, the use of bombing is then justified with the intention to protect the stability of a state as it seems to be the only solution that is effective. There are two kinds of bombing methods which are, aerial and precise bombings.Aerial bombing which occurs during the night involves randomized bombing to the targeted areas whilst precise bombing involves a more accurate bombing during the day.Any forms of bombing will certainly cause huge casualties. But, by adopting the precise bombing method, the total casualties can be reduced. In effect, precise bombing will minimize the casualties as much as possible compared to using aerial bombing. In regard to the legitimacy to bomb cities in order to end a war more quickly, different states may have different views on the use of bombing s
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