Class Notes (837,000)
Canada (509,985)
KIN 261 (11)
All (5)
Lecture 5

Week 5

9 Pages
44 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Kinesiology
Course
KIN 261
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Spring

Description
Week #5 – The Pharmaceutical Industry 03/11/2014 Objective: identify and explain the life cycle of a drug and name and explain the four key sociological areas  of analysis/ critique related to the pharmaceutical industry.  Summary Sociological Critiques of the Pharmaceutical Industry (different aspects of the life cycle of a drug)  Medicalization and Pharmaceuticalization  Which drugs are (not) Developed and Why? The Marketing of Pharmaceuticals  Pharmaceuticals Pharmaceuticals are an essential element of modern medicine and when used appropriately can be of  great value in maintaining and restoring health Textbook page 278** Important contributions the pharmaceutical industry has made to human health Textbook pages 278­284** characteristics of the pharmaceutical industry  The Life Cycle of a Drug Conception/ Drug Discovery: potential product/ drug identified Research/ Trials: manufacturers test the drug on cells and animals Regulatory Approval: apply for drug approval from Health Canada, which reviews results of clinical trials  done by the manufacturer. Health Canada does not perform its own clinical trials.  Marketing and Promotion: if approved by Health Canada, drug is licensed and manufacturer may begin to  market/ promote the product. Prescription and Consumption: doctors prescribe the medication and patients begin to use them. Post­marketing Surveillance: manufacturers and Health Canada watch for intended effects of the drug.  Surveillance occurs at all stages, however it may occur after the fact.  What if unintended effects are discovered? Panapathogen: negative unintended effects leads to either an advisory or the withdrawal of the drug from  the market (e.g. Vioxx recalled in 2004). Withdrawal may by voluntary done by the company or forced by  Health Canada.  Pancea: positive unintended effects may lead to a new drug life cycle (e.g. Asprin, painkiller to treatment for  heart attack). It is argued that very few drugs continue to be used for their original purpose.  What’s Sociology Got to Do with the Life Cycle of a Drug? Four key areas of sociological analysis/ critique: Medicalization and Pharmaceuticalization Which drugs are (not) Developed and Why? Iatrogenesis The Marketing of Pharmaceuticals Medicalization This concept is affiliated with Marxism and Feminism Defined as “the process by which nonmedical problems become defined  and treated as medical issues,  usually in terms of illnesses, disorders, or syndromes” “non­problems” defined as problems requiring medical attention Ivan Illich raised the alarm about the ‘medicalization of everyday life’ Irving Zola argued that medicine had become as “institution of social control” Medicalization  ▯ Social Control Labeling of non­medical aspects of life as either healthy/ normal or unhealthy/ deviant (assign value) Example: wrinkles Scope of jurisdiction of medicine is “elastic and increasingly expensive” Other (non­medical) explanations for behavior less accepted, medicine defines social norms  Medicalization of sexual preference: homosexuality labeled a psychiatric illness (cure was psychotherapy,  drugs, surgery)  Medicalization of breast size: small breast syndrome (cure is surgery and implants) Pharmaceuticalization Defined as “the process by which social, behavioral, or bodily conditions are treated, or deemed to be in  need of treatment/ interventions, with pharmaceuticals”  “non­problems” defined as problems requiring pharmaceutical intervention The pharmaceutical industry, rather than medicine, has been the driving force behind the definition of ‘non­ problems’ as illnesses requiring intervention The pharmaceutical industry has therefore become a powerful agent of social control. Diseases and conditions “dreamed up” in pharmaceutical lab. Who is driving the definition of what is  healthy and what is not?  Pharmaceutical Industry  ▯ Social Control Pharmaceutical companies (through marketing and by influencing doctors) increasingly define what is  healthy/ normal or unhealthy/ deviant Solutions are pharmaceutical products  Examples of Pharmaceuticalization Pharmaceuticalization of women’s aging: menopause defined as sickness, cure was/ is hormone  replacement therapy Pharmaceuticalization of men’s aging: identification of ‘andropause’, cure is synthetic testosterone Pharmaceuticalization of shyness in the 1980s, labeled as a form of mental illness, cure was psychotherapy  and drugs Pharmaceuticalization of aging process: cure is Botox, various injectable fillers, etc.  Which Drugs are (not) Developed and Why? Pharmaceutical industry is big business which is motivated by profits not altruism  Majority of research and development of drugs is done in private industry (rather than in universities or not­ for­profit contexts) Emphasis on the development of a drug “that can be patented, is used by a large number of people over  lengthy periods, and can be priced quite highly in relation to production c
More Less

Related notes for KIN 261

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit