Class Notes (835,428)
Canada (509,186)
Psychology (2,094)
PSYC 208 (100)
All (9)
Lecture

Causes of Psychopathology Notes

5 Pages
96 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 208
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Fall

Description
Causes of Psychopathology Introductory remarks Proximate causes • Genetic susceptibility • Adverse experiences in early childhood • Overt brain injuries • Senescence Knowledge about different disorders has increased due to  • Advances in psychiatric genetics, • Brain imaging technology • Improved understanding of the relationship between adverse early childhood  experiences and the development of psychopathology later in life Apparently there is little common ground between the fields of genetics,  neuroscience, and animal models of psychiatric disorders on one hand, and the  various disciplines of psychotherapy, social psychiatry or cross­cultural psychiatry on  the other. Scientific explanations are limited as they don’t take into account • What causes dysfunction (mechanism) • When the dysfunction set in (ontogeny) • Why is the original function of the mechanism designed the way it is (adaptive  function) • How it evolved (phylogeny) Psychopathological signs are maladaptive in both current perspective and ultimate  perspective because they can cause harm to the individual and are dysfunctional by  their abnormal intensity duration.  What is perceived as abnormal, however, is not simply a matter of objective  evaluation which is free from cultural norms and values. However, there may be quite  large differences of what is considered abnormal depending on the cultural  background.  In a broader view, ADHD, eating disorders, or the epidemic of drug and alcohol  dependence may be ‘culture­bound.’ Whether or not primary prevention of psychiatric disorders is a realistic goal is hotly  debated, but the outcome and prognosis of psychiatric disorders can certainly be  improved  if early signs and symptoms do not go undetected for months or even years,  as is currently still the case in most disorders.  Current psychiatric conceptualizations are also unable to account for sex differences  in presentation of psychopathological signs and symptoms. Emphasizing the role of the sex hormone does not explain why there is a sex  difference in behaviours and how it translates into the diagnostic schemes of  psychiatric disorders.  Borderline personality disorder more prevalent in women, opposite is true for anti­ social personality and delusional jealousy.  Differences betweent he sexes in terms of vulnerability to stress have largely been  disregarded.  Men experience more psychological distress after experiencing negative achievements  and women experience it due to negative interpersonal events.  Psychiatric disorders broadly overlap, and there is also continuity between disordered  states and ‘normalcy.’  DSM and ICD allow for making dsgnoses of an infinite number of comorbid  psychiatric disorders, but certainly some comorbidities go together more often than  others. Research into psychopathology including an evolutionary perspective may not only  help explain the worldwide increase in prevalence of psychiatric disorders, but also  inform studies into resilience and vulnerability factors of mental disorders.  By integrating proximate and ultimate causation of psychiatric disorders is that  knowledge how and why psychological mechanisms evolved in our species may  strengthen research into resilience against the development of psychopathological  conditions.  Evolutionary constraints of psychological adaptedness Common understanding of evolutionary processes suggests that pathologies –  regardless whether physical, cognitive, emotional, or behavioural – convey fitness  disadvantages in terms of survival and reproduction and should therefore be  eliminated by selection over generations. This assumptions disregards two things 1. Majority of adaptations are not optimal by design. 2. Evolution can’t create physical or mental traits de novo. New adaptations  derive from pre­existing structures. Evolution through selection is neither purposeful nor progressive.  The majority of adaptation are not optimal by design. Evolution by selection is a  ‘thrifty’ process, such that evlved physical or psychological traits are just sufficiently  well designed to fulfill their function proper. Morever, evolution cannot create  physical or mental traits de novo.  Evolution by selection has equipped defence mechanisms with low and perhaps labile  stimulus thresholds, for example fear and anxiety. Unfavourable environmental  conditions and/or individual predisposition may cause abnormally frequent release of  fear reactions, which, in turn, may lead to tissue damage due to hyperactivity of the  HPA axis.  The threshold of anxious reactions can vary within an individual. For example, a  person walking alone in the dark almost certainly has a lower threshold for fear  reactions than the same individual if he or she is in food company with trustworthy  people.  Secondly, modern environments have little in common with ancestral living  conditions. This can be referred to as the ‘mismatch hypothesis’ which is the  likelihood that modern environmental conditions including accentuated social  competition potentiate the risk that an individual’s biosocial goals such as care­ seeking, care­giving, mate attraction, cooperation with others, and attaining an  acceptable social status are thwarted has increased by magnitudes compared to the  EEA. The ‘thrifty gene hypothesis’ posists that genes for maximum calorie extraction were  selected, which now in times of oversupply and abundance of high­caloric diet cause  harm.  In  ‘modern societies,’ it is still common practice to separate human newborns from  their mothers after birth (at least temporarily), and to separate young mothers from  their supporting social environment.  Accidental overlaying may be a cause for sudden infant death syndrome.  Disorganized attachment is more prevelant in infants of parents with psychiatric  disorders, including affective disorders and substance dependence compared to  healthy parents, and the child’s contradictory behaviours oriented towards its  caregiver reflects the ambilivance between being attracted to the caregiver, who at the  same time is a source of threat or maltreatment.  A parent who expresses threats of suicide not only induces fear of loss and  abandonment in the hild but also confounds attachment related fears with feelings of  guilt.  Physical and emotional abuse ma 
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 208

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit