Class Notes (836,321)
Canada (509,732)
Psychology (2,093)
PSYC 208 (100)
All (9)
Lecture

Notes on Dementia

3 Pages
57 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 208
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Fall

Description
Dementia Dementia is characterized by an insidious and progressive loss of memory, disorientation,  cognitive decline, and affective flattening.  Accompanied by neuropsychological deficits such as aphasia, apraxia, agnosia or  disturbances in executive functioning.  Behavioural symptoms such as withdrawl, depression, delusions, motor restlessness,  wandering or aggression may complicate dementia, particularly in the advanced stages of the  disorder.  A person who has impaired ability to retrieve past interactions from autobiographical memory  may repsond with increasing irritability or anxiety in situations that are actually or perceived  unfamiliar.  Combination of memory loss with other cognitive disturbances leads to a profound  deterioration of social competence. Dementia creates a substantial burden on patients’ spouses, children and other carers.  Epidemology Most common form of demetia is Alzheimer’s disease (AD), which accounts for approx. two­ thirds of all dementing disorders. The prevelance of AD increases steadily from about 1% in people 65+, to over 20% in the  ninth decade of life. In some populations worldwide, the rates for AD have been reported to be lower than in  Western countries.  The conversion rate of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia is between 25% and  50% at 2­to­3 year follow­up.  A variant of AD is dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), which is often associated with  parkinsonism, visual hallucinations, fluctuating vigilance, and intolerance of antipsychotic  drugs. Vascular dementia (VD) is the second­most common form of demetia in countries with high  prevalence and 20% cases overlap with AD. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) compromises a spectrum of non­Alzheimer diseases  affecting the frontal lobe with predominating behavioural symptoms and personality change.  Genetic risk factors The risk for developing AD is increased in first­degree relatives of patients with AD,  suggesting a heritable component. By age 90, relatives of AD patients have a cumilative risk of 15% to 20% for developing AD  compared to 5% in controls.  Double concordance rates in MZ twins : 30% to 80% DZ twins : 10% to 40% However, familial AD accounts for only 13% of early onset cases and less than 0.01% of all  AD. Late onset AD is associated with polymorphisms of the apolopoprotein­E family on  chromosome 19, with ApoE4 conveying the greatest risk for developing AD.  Environmental risk factors Age is the most significant risk factor for AD. People with down’s syndrome may develop the disorder in their 40s.  Poor education and oestrogen depletion at menopause have also been discussed as putative  risk factors for AD. Pathophysiological mechanisms Humans possess three isoforms of ApoE, namely ApoE3, and ApoE4, the most common one  being ApoE3, ApoE4 is found in about 15% and ApoE2 found in about 8% of individuals.  A­beta is usually produced in a minor pathway of APP metabolism thrugh the action of beta  and gamma­secretase mediated by the availability of intracellular cholestrol. Excessive production of abnormal A­bet
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 208

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit