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Lecture

Business Communications - Module 11

5 Pages
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School
UOIT
Department
Business
Course Code
BUSI 1020U
Professor
William Thurber

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Description
Module 11: Composing Informative and Positive Messages Business Communications February 18 2012 How Should I organize Informative and Positive Messages? - Consider your audience’s needs: put the good news and a summary of the information first. - Present informative and positive messages in the following order:  Give any good news and summarize the main points:  Share good news immediately, include details such as the date that policies begin and the percent of a discount.  Give details, clarification, and background.  Don’t repeat information from the first paragraph.  Answer all the questions your reader is likely to have.  Provide all information necessary.  Present any negative elements as positively as possible.  A policy might have limits; information might be incomplete, etc.  Make the negatives clear but present them as positively as possible.  Explain any reader benefits  Most informative memos need reader benefits.  Show that the policy/procedure helps readers, not just the company.  Give enough detail to make the benefits clear and convincing.  Use a goodwill ending: positive, personal, and forward-looking  Shifting your emphasis away from the message to the specific reader suggests that serving the reader is your real concern. When should I use reader benefits in Informative and Positive Messages? - Use reader benefits when you want readers to view your policies and your organization positively. - You don’t need reader benefits when:  You’re presenting factual information only.  The reader’s attitude toward the information doesn’t matter.  Stressing benefits may make the reader sound selfish.  The benefits are so obvious that to restate them insults the reader’s intelligence. - You do need reader benefits when:  You are presenting policies  You want to shape readers’ attitudes toward the information or toward your organization.  Stressing benefits presents readers’ motives positively  Some of the benefits may not be obvious to readers. - Messages to customers or potential customers sometimes include a sales paragraph promoting products or services you offer, in addition to the product or service that the reader has asked about. - Sales promotion in an informative or positive message should be low-key, not ‘hard sell”. - The organization has probably decided to adopt the policy in its own interests; the people who made the decision may not have thought about whether it would help or hurt employees. - When you present reader benefits, be sure to present the advantages for the reader. Instructions - Information on new procedures may generate hostility, since most of us are reluctant to change. Transmittals - When sending someone in an organization a hardcopy message, attach a memo or letter of transmittal explaining what you’re sending. - A transmittal can be as simple as a small yellow Post-it note with FYI written on it, or it can be a separate typed document. - Organize a memo or letter of transmittal in this order: o Tell the reader what you’re sending o Summarize the main point(s) of the document o Indicate any special circumstances or information that would help the reader understand the document. o Tell the reader what will happen next. What kinds of Informative and Positive Messages am I likely to write? - You will likely write instructions, transmittals, confirmations, summaries, adjustments and thank-you notes. - Readers may feel neutral about assembly, safety, and fire drill instructions. - A transmittal can be positive when you’re sending glowing sales figures, or
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