Class Notes (836,997)
Canada (510,028)
UOIT (1,700)
FSCI 1010U (51)
Lecture

Feb 26.docx

7 Pages
85 Views
Unlock Document

School
Department
Forensic Science
Course
FSCI 1010U
Professor
David Robertson
Semester
Winter

Description
Feb 26, 2014 F RICTION  R IDGE  I DENTIFICATION A.F.I.S = A UTOMATED  FINGERPRINT  IDENTIFICATION  S YSTEM By Mary Beeton (Durham Region Police Service), AFIS specialist ­ The black lines represent the ridges ­ The white lines represent the furrows ­ Along with sweat glands on the friction ridged texturized skin ( hands, specifically) Patterns ­ Arches ­ Loop ; 60% of the population have loop patterned fingertips, with a triangular area (delta region) ­ Whorl, there are 2 delta features ­ Central part of a print: a focal point or the Core  Detail ‘Minutiae’ – where ridges start or stop ­ Ending Ridge ­ Dividing Ridge or Bifurcation ­ Ridge Dot ­ Rides may get thicker or thinner big or small pores B IOLOGY  AND  S KIN ­ Ridges skin is unique and persistent, unless you have scar tissue or if they start to decompose ­ Skin is made of Epidermis ( friction ridge skin) and the lower tissues, the dermis ­ In fetal development, they develop on the epidermal cells going into the dermis (at 8 weeks, swollen baby skin, in the  palm as well) ­ 5 digit volar pads ­ 4 integral volar pads ­ Thenar volar pad ( the thumb meat) ­ The volar pads are at its finest in development during 8 weeks, its eventually absorbed into the finger ­ Sweat gland formation ­15 to 17 weeks ­ 17­24 weeks: Secondary ridge, create ridge ending and minutiae, secondary cellular proliferation of the epidermal cells  into the dermis ­ They penetrate as deep as the primary ridges, and they lack sweat glands ­ They start in the center and the outside of the pad, growing at the same time, into one another ­ At 24 weeks, your fingerprints are set ­ The position of the volar pad determines the formation that your fingerprints will form ­ You maintain the same fingerprints from when you’re born to when you die Twin Fingerprints ­ Share the same DNA, but not always the same fingerprints. F INGER  P RINT  H ISTORY ­ Mid 1800s to mid 1900s ­ Alphonse Bertillon; measured body[parts, from a family of anthropologists and their measuring tools, 1 / 4.5 million  have the same measurements. Worked for the police force in France, and identified a few major criminals ­ William Herschel ­ Sir Francis Galton ­ Sir Edward Henry; classifying fingerprints, a way to file and retrieve them ­ Dr. Henry Faulds; fingerprints for solving crimes ­ Research continues AFIS ­ A computerized database consisting of fingerprint and palm print images as well as ridge detail formation ­ And investigative tool ­ Livescan system that collects prints electronically ­ The pressure of the finger­stamp affects the ridge characteristics ­ AFIS stored the image and the minutiae separately, so that a list of candidates is wider ­ Inked vs. livescan fingerprint ­ Livescan cannot fix skin abnormality,  ­ Instantly searched RCMP database, and all unsolved crime scene prints in a database  ­ SOCO officers can collect and processing latent prints, which can be faulty, or broken ­ There are certain chemicals within your sweat that absorb into paper, and when tested, they show up as being purple ­ 90 million fingerprints across Canada ­ If they don’t match identically, sh =e must be able to argue the discrepancies ­ Analysis, Comparison, and Evaluation, the database fives her 20 to 30 at a time. F ORENSIC  E NTOMOLOGY By Alicia Saddler and Stephanie Kolodij ­ The study of insects ­ Literally the study of things that are cut into pieces ­ They are one of the largest and more diverse groups on the plannet ­ 1.3 million speces have been described, 3­30 million left 9gross estimation) ­ 2.3 of all known organisms ­ Surpass the mass of humans by about 300x ­ Are a food source for everything else, including humans ­ Predictable development and life cycles ­ Can be found in most terrestrial environments and water habitats as well, ubiquitous ­ Wings have evolved Invertebrate animals are characterized by; ­ Exoskeleton ­ 6 jointed legs ­ Sectioned into 3 distinct regions ­ Compound eyes ­ Antennae A S  A PPLIED  TO  L AW Urban; ­ Investigation of insect pests as public measurements ­ Abuse and neglect – nursing homes or hospitals, bedsores and improper care of wounds ­ Agricultural community Stored product pests ­ Disputes of insects 9 or parts) in food products ­ fraud Medicolegal ­ Examination of (usually) nechrophagous insects associated with decaying remains at crime scenes H ISTORY ­ Sung Tz’u; the washing away of wrongs ­ A sickle was used to kill someone, they called all the sickles in the village and although the blood had been cleaned,  hundreds of insects swarmed to the blade, and the murderer confessed and was executed. ­ Bergeret D’Arbois (1814 – 1893); post­ mortem interval; mummified remains of a human child. ­ Insects are the only way to accurately determine the PMI after 72 hours of death ­ Jean Pierre Megnin (1828­1905): successional waves of insects on corpses, one of the first to publish his works ­ Johnston and Villeneuve (1897): early use of insect development to estimate since death, tested in Canada, in a  climate similar to France.  A PPLICATIONS ; ­ Abuse/Neglect: myiasis or colonization of a living body with insects, they work to decompose organic material,   ­ Ex. Case Study; in Thaiand Human myiasis confounding PMI estimation, a homeless m
More Less

Related notes for FSCI 1010U

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit