Class Notes (838,704)
Canada (511,053)
Administration (2,738)
ADM1340 (195)
Lecture

Chapter 8 Lecture Notes

5 Pages
77 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Administration
Course
ADM1340
Professor
Lamia Chourou
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 8 ­ Reporting and Analyzing Receivables Learning Objectives • Explain how receivables are recognized and valued in the accounts. • Explain the statement presentation of receivables. • Apply the principles of sound accounts receivable management. Receivables • The term receivables refers to amounts that are due to a business from customers or other entities • Receivables are frequently classified as: o Accounts receivable o Notes receivable o Other receivables (interest receivable, loans to company officers, advances to employees,  and recoverable sales taxes and income taxes) Recognizing Accounts Receivables • Accounts receivables are: o Amounts owed by customers on account o Result from the sale of goods and services o Expected to be collected within 30 days o Usually the most significant type of claim held by a company • Receivables are reduced when: o Cash is collected o The customer takes advantage of a sales discount o The customer returns the product • Receivables are increased: o If a customer does not pay in full within a specified period of time (usually 30 days) o An interest (financing) charge may be added to the balance due (an increase to interest  revenue) • Receivables are reported in the statement of financial position as a current asset • Some accounts receivable become uncollectible • Need to estimate the amount of receivables that are expected to become uncollectible in the future:  Allowance method • At the end of each period: o Estimate the uncollectible accounts o Show this estimate in Allowance for doubtful accounts:  Dr. Bad debts expense       Cr. Allowance for doubtful accounts  (To record estimate of uncollectible accounts) Estimating the Allowance 1. Percentage of total receivables • Management estimates the percentage of outstanding receivables that will result in losses from  uncollectible accounts • E.g. Uncollectible accounts are expected to be 4% of accounts receivables 2. Aging the accounts receivable method • Classifies the outstanding accounts by age and applies percentages to these categories based on  past experience Recording the Write­Off of an Uncollectible • Actual uncollectibles are debited to Allowance for doubtful accounts and credited to Accounts  receivable at the time the specific amount is written off as uncollectible o Dr. Allowance for doubtful accounts o      Cr. Accounts receivable • Under the allowance method, every bad debt write­off is debited to the Allowance account and not  to Bad debts expense Recovery of an Uncollectible Account • When a bed debt is recovered, two entries are required: o The entry made in writing off the account is reversed; if a partial payment is received,  only that amount is reinstated  Dr. Accounts receivable       Cr. Allowance for doubtful accounts o The collection is recorded in the usual manner  Dr. Cash       Cr. Accounts receivable Exercise P8­5A. a) Number of Days Outstanding Total 0­30 31­60 61­90 Over 90 Accounts  $520,000 $240,000 $120,000 $100,000 $60,000 receivable Estimated  1% 5% 10% 25% percentage  uncollectible $33,400 $2,400 $6,000 $10,000 $15,000 b) Dec. 31 Bad debts expense 13,400      Allowance for doubtful accounts 13,400 • If the unadjusted balance was a debit of $20,000, you would need to credit ADA for $53,400 c) Dec. 31 Allowance for doubtful accounts 4,000      Accounts receivable 4,000 d) Dec. 31 Accounts receivable 1,700      Allowance for doubtful accounts 1,700 Cash 1,700      Accounts receivable 1,700 e) It prevents Accounts receivable from being overstated, as well as proper matching between revenues and  expenses. f) Estimated uncollectible amount = 520,000 x 5% = $26,000 (b) Dec. 31 Bad debts expense 6,000      Allowance for doubtful accounts 6,000 • If the unadjusted balance was a debit of $20,000, you would need to credit ADA for $46,000 g) The aging method takes into account the likeliness of payment after a longer amount of time into the  period. The estimate of the collectible is more accurate. Notes Receivable • Formal instruments of credit issued as evidence of debt • Normally require payment of interest and extend for 30 days or longer • May be current or non­current assets depending on their due dates • Notes and accounts receivable resulting from sales are called trade receivables • A promissory note is a written promise to pay a specified amount of money on demand or at a  definite time • The party making the promise to pay is the maker: Note payable • The party to whom payment is to be made is called the payee: Note receivable • At the time a note is received, it is recorded at the principal value or face value with no interest 
More Less

Related notes for ADM1340

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit