Class Notes (834,331)
Canada (508,487)
Communication (1,826)
CMN3133 (22)
Lecture

CMN 3133 Lecture #13 .docx

9 Pages
106 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Communication
Course
CMN3133
Professor
herrara-vega
Semester
Fall

Description
CMN 3133: Lecture #13 Nov 12 2013  The Public and Public Opinion in Political Theories  Entwined Concepts: Public Opinion and Democracy Public opinion and democracy▯ linked together by democracy.  Referendum­ looks at the relationship of power/not power and a separate social system of law  Kantian judgments­ expressing a judgment with some attribution of true to the external reality.  This builds every type of communication today  Thoughts can be translated into statements that can be written, into the media and outside of my own  thoughts.  Can explain aspects of reality▯ logical form of true/false  Judgement:  The central cognitive faculty of the rational human mind ,  by insisting on the semantic, logical, psychological, epistemic, and practical priority of the  propositional content of a judgment , and   by systematically embedding judgment within the metaphysics of transcendental idealism  .  Kant:  Judgments are complex conscious cognitions that  (i) refer to objects either directly (via intuitions) or indirectly (via concepts),  (ii) include concepts that are predicated either of those objects or of other constituent concepts,  (iii) exemplify pure logical concepts and enter into inferences according to pure logical laws,  (iv) essentially involve both the following of rules and the application of rules to the objects picked out by  intuitions,  (v) express true or false propositions (truth­aptness), (vi) mediate the formation of beliefs and other intentional acts, and (vii) are unified and self­conscious.  (Hanna, 2013) “judgment” (Urteil ) is a specific kind of “cognitioErkenntnis )—which he generically defines as any  conscious mental representation of an object (A320/B376)—that is the characteristic output of the “power of  judgment” (Urteilskraft ). The power of judgment, in turn, is a cognitive “capacityFähigkeit ) but also  specifically spontaneous and  innate  cognitive capacity, and in virtue of these is it is the “faculty of  judging” Vermögen zu urteilen ) (A69/B94), which is also the same as the “faculty of thinking”  (Vermögen zu denken ) (A81/B106). (Hanna, 2013) what you have learned about others judgments is that you can apply them to new experiences.  Kantian judgments are  neither  merely psychological objects or processes (as in psychologistic theories of judgment)  nor  are they essentially mind­independent, abstract objects (as in platonistic theories of judgment), nor  again are they inherently assertoric takings of propositions to be true (Hanna, 2013) Kantian judgments are inter­subjectively shareable, rationally communicable, cognitively­generated mental­ act structures or types whose logically­structured truth­apt semantic contents can be the targets of many  different kinds of epistemic or non­epistemic propositional attitudes. Public:  public, from the Latin publicus meaning  ‘the people,’ Second usage, public referred to the common interest and common good, not in the sense of access (or  belonging to) but rather in the sense of representing (that is, in the name of) the whole of the people. Thus  the monarch under the theory of royal absolutism was the sole public figure, representing by divine right the  entirety of the kingdom in his person. public opinion came into widespread use only in the eighteenth  century and as the product of  several significant historical trends, primarily the growth of literacy, expansion of the merchant classes, the  Protestant Reformation, and the circulation of literature enabled by the printing press. An ascendant class  of literate and well­read European merchants, congregating in new popular institutions such as salons  and coffee houses and emboldened by new liberal philosophies arguing for basic  individual freedoms, began to articulate a critique of royal absolutism and to assert their interests in political affairs (Habermas, 1962/1989). In order to reach public good  Are we in the right co existence to discuss How does the new media intervene  How is power dealing with the new form of communication  Reading: Baker (1990) argues that with the dissolution of absolute monarchical power, both the crown and  its opponents alike invoked public opinion as a new source of authority and legitimacy, largely in rhetorical  fashion and without any fixed sociological referent. Reading: Mill (1820/1937) and Bentham (1838/1962). While continuing to argue for full publicity of  government affairs and strongly advocating freedom of expression, these analysts saw the polity less as the  coming together of separate minds reasoning together toward a shared, common will than as a collection of individuals attempting to maximize their own interests and utilities.  The problem is more practical▯ we must live in a world where we can self­express, freedom, be selfish, we  are all entitled to have clashing perspectives. We cannot express ourselves without the fear of an above all  authority.  It is about the protection of the individual­ the right to self expression  A minority can guide public opinion  You protect the ones which are you opponents because you truly want to preserve the debate­ this is true  democracy.  Ex: in class▯ Quebec case of the prohibition of the hijab and minority groups speaking out because free  speech is permitted.  The harmonization of these conflicting interests was best achieved not through public reasoning to any consensual conclusion, but instead through rule by majority, requiring  regular election and plebiscite, with the state functioning as a referee to individuals and groups vying to  achieve their economic and political ends.  ‘A key proposition,’ writes Held (1996, p. 95), ‘was that the collective good could be realized only if  individuals interacted in competitive exchanges pursuing their utility with minimal state interference.’  Thus public opi
More Less

Related notes for CMN3133

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit