Class Notes (834,756)
Canada (508,705)
Communication (1,829)
CMN3133 (22)
Lecture

CMN 3133 Lecture #12 .docx

8 Pages
62 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Communication
Course
CMN3133
Professor
herrara-vega
Semester
Fall

Description
CMN 3133: Lecture #11 Nov 5th 2013  Selective exposure:   Depends on what the contents of the chosen media are.  David O. Sears and Jonathan L. Freedman. (1965). “Selective Exposure to Information: A Critical Review,”  Public Opinion Quarterly 31 (2), 194­213. Natalie Jomini Stroud. (2008). “Media Use and Political Predispositions: Revisiting the Concept of Selective  Exposure,” Political Behavior  30 (3), 341­366. Shanto Iyengar and Kyu S. Hahn. (2009). “Red Media, Blue Media: Evidence of Ideological Selectivity in  Media Use,” Journal of Communication  59 (1), 19­39. Question surrounding the research: What predicts media exposure ? People engage in selective exposure, the selection of media outlets that match their beliefs and  predispositions.  The concept of selective exposure surged in the 1960s and then declined in subsequent decades following  influential reviews of the literature that did not support the phenomenon (Freedman and Sears 1965; Sears  and Freedman 1967).  Different patterns of news exposure may lead people to develop different impressions of what is happening  in the world around them.  Without a shared base of information, it is difficult to imagine citizens agreeing on matters of public policy  and it is easy to envision citizens developing highly polarized attitudes toward political matters.  As media exposure predicts both beliefs and attitudes, the question emerges: what predicts media  exposure?  1960s­ more neutral towards this selective vs. today more engaged and involved in the structure and how  the individual feels towards the media  Individuals do tend to choose information supporting their beliefs ▯ to support and identfy their views in a  political race.  Possibility of a number of contingent conditions:  Jomini: influence whether people engage in selective exposure to news media (Cotton 1985; Frey 1986).  Following this line of research, her study investigates contingent conditions, including whether different  media types (e.g. newspapers, political talk radio, etc.) are more/less likely to motivate selective exposure  and whether selective exposure changes during an election season.    Jomini:  Certain media types may facilitate selective exposure based on their availability and the diversity of content  they provide. Further, as partisanship is emphasized during presidential campaigns, people may increasingly select  congenial outlets as an election approaches  Exposure and Belief:  Those viewing FOX news were more likely to believe in both the link and the weapons while those watching  PBS and listening to NPR were less likely (Kull et al. 2003­4).  The implications of this finding are troubling: Different patterns of news exposure may lead people to  develop different impressions of what is happening in the world around them  Selective Exposure and Public Sphere:  Without a shared base of information, it is difficult to imagine citizens agreeing on matters of public policy  and it is easy to envision citizens developing highly polarized attitudes toward political matters  Problems defining how to allocate resources Misidentification of public goods Polarization of political views Theoretically, selective exposure occurs when people's beliefs guide their media selections.  Not every belief can guide every media selection, however ­ if one considered all of the beliefs that would  favor exposure to a media outlet, for example, and all of the beliefs that would not favor exposure to the  outlet, one would be at an impasse.  Some beliefs, therefore, must be more likely to guide exposure decisions compared to other beliefs.  Personal Identity:  One possibility is that personally relevant beliefs, those beliefs related to a person's interests or self­identity,  are more likely to influence exposure decisions (Donsbach 1991).  If one cared little about politics, for example, s/he would have little motivation to seek out congenial media.  From a cognitive perspective, personally relevant beliefs are more readily activated from memory and  hence, are more likely to guide our thoughts ­ and, as advanced here, our media selections.  Price and Tewksbury (1997) explain, certain constructs are chronically accessible ­ irrespective of the  situation, they are more likely to be used as a basis for processing information.  Political partisanship:  Political partisanship represents one such construct (Green et al. 2002; Lau 1989). In contrast to other  topics, those with strong political leanings may be particularly likely to engage in selective exposure  because their political beliefs are accessible and personally relevant.  Also, topics and beliefs inspiring an affective response may stimulate patterns of selectiv
More Less

Related notes for CMN3133

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit