Class Notes (836,292)
Canada (509,749)
Criminology (2,472)
CRM1301 (295)
Lecture 5

Lecture 5 John Stewart Mill.doc

3 Pages
88 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Criminology
Course
CRM1301
Professor
Carolyn Gordon
Semester
Fall

Description
John Stuart Mill: Law, Liberty and Harm • Mill focuses on how we come to know things and the reasons for why we believe them • Interested how we come to know things and why we know them  • Can you turn the way you think on yourself, then you can become a rational free thinking  person  • If you can’t turn it onto itself, you just have an opinion that can’t be backed up logically is  worth nothing • We should be able to think for ourselves • Standing for what you believe  • Mill is concerned with the limits and nature of power • How much can the sovereign do  • This is a concern that resonates with Locke, what limits does the sovereign have  • Mill is interested in rights • Liberty must come out of rationality and reason  • Rights and rationality don’t come out of the state of nature like Locke believed • Locke­ principles of nature, using rationality we can tap into them and bring them into  society • Capacity to think=principles of nature • Mill is concerned with what happens with what happens when you put the principles of  nature in society  • Mill believes that once we bring them in, it makes us stop thinking    • Mill believes the ability to think makes us who we are, and when we stop thinking, it is a  problem  • Mill believes that the idea of a social contract makes no sense • Social contract is symbolic of a particular time and place, makes uncertainty certain for  Hobbes and Locke  • Mill wants us to think about if the social contract represents who we are today  • Have we bought into the idea that the social contract is good and stopped thinking  • Do people have the ability to think and change things  • Rights don’t come out of a state of nature  • Utility (happiness) is the ultimate appeal of all ethical questions (just like Bentham)  • Happiness and liberty go together • The more liberty= more happiness, vise versa  • Individual freedom and able to do what we please make us happy • Abuses of power of authority, power, and oppression, don’t only come from the state, they  come mainly from or equally from the majority • The majority is you and I  • Concern of not just the state but of people  • Concern of opinions • Look at what opinion can do for people  • Concern is about what people are doing  • “Tyranny of the majority”­ you oppress your fellow beings more than the state does  • Tyranny of the majority has the potential to reduce happiness • This is a call for people to think through their opinions  • Majority drown outs the of the minority  • An opinion is not right or wrong, good or bad, it is just a preference  • Stating what you like  • Cant legislate against taste • To do so, you presume that there is a rightness to this opinion • No reasons for opinion  • A majority does not make it right, it is still an opinion  • The justification cannot be “but everyone else thinks so” or “but we have been doing it like  this for a long time”  • The minority does not make that person wrong
More Less

Related notes for CRM1301

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit