Class Notes (834,026)
Canada (508,290)
Criminology (2,468)
CRM1301 (295)
Lecture 3

Lecture 3 Ceasre Beccaria.doc

7 Pages
100 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Criminology
Course
CRM1301
Professor
Carolyn Gordon
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 3­ Ceasre Beccaria  January 31, 12 • No such thing as criminology in 1764, when he is writing this  • There are to types of criminology: • Classical and positivist  • Classical means Beccaria and Bentham • Positivist means Lombaroso  • These terms don’t exist when they were writing, we made them up to make sense of what  they are writing  • Classical criminology emerges when you have a rational type of thinking with a type of  science  • Classical is saying that intelligence and rationality are fundamental characteristics (Hobbes  and Locke) • Rationality explains why people do the things that they do   • For a classical crim. We have free will, we are the authors of our own destiny or script,  were able to understand who we are, and we can figure out what is in our best interest • The key to progress in humanity is rationality and you get this by education and training  • Crime is a product of the free choice of the individual  • Before we decide to commit crime we weigh the benefits against the potential costs  (rational calculus)  • If the costs outweigh the benefits, you will not commit the crime  • If you want to prevent crime, ensure that the costs of committing crime always outweigh  the benefits of the crime  • Positivist criminology emerges in the mid to late 19  century th • Lasts until mid 20  century  • Behaviour is not a product of the individual  • We don’t have freewill  • We are not the authors of our own destiny  • Behaviour is already predetermined  • Crime will fall into this same category • Crime is not a product of freewill • The cost benefit is nonsense  • We are the one who are criminals, it has nothing to do with choice, it is already  predetermined  • Punishment is useless because it is a band aid solution  • If you want to control crime, you want to attack the true causes of crime (psychological,  sociological) • Punishment does not stop it • How to stop cheating: • Consequences, different versions of the test, ask an opinionated question, watching the  students, spread people out, dress code • 3 ways we come to know • Revelation­ Devine though • Principles of nature­ state of nature and the laws that come out of that • Artificial conventions of society­ man made law • Beccaria believes there is an abuse of power by the government when positive law is  made  • Reflection from positive law to natural law is missing  • Just like Locke, Government has the right to make law, and it is a right that we give  government  • Government has responsibilities and duties to the people • WHEN YOU MAKE LAW YOU MUST FOLLOW THESE DUTIES, IF YOU DON’T DO THIS  THEN YOU ARE NOT ACTING IN THE POWER THAT WE GAVE YOU • The Origins of society • Abuse of power • Locke­ purpose of government is to pass good law to preserve property • Government is supposed to safeguard our interests  • For Beccaria the government works in their own interest and abuses their power  • The Social Contract • Beccaria, Locke, Hobbes­ Social contract theorists • Beccaria is buying into everything Locke and Hobbes say as their starting point • Closer to Locke than Hobbes  • When the government is not protecting our interests there is a state of uncertainty,  injustice and equality • People don’t want to give up their freedom for a system that is worse  • Divine/Natural v. Political Justice  • Divine is not the same as natural justice  • They never change  • Political justice comes from civil law  • Peoples wants and needs change over time • If you have a system that does not allow change, you end up with a system that is unjust • Doesn’t allow you to change your laws to the needs and wants of the people  • A positive system must change over time and place  • When you pull principles of nature out and put them into society, they might or might not  reflect what happens in the state of nature • You want to try and at least get the form­ Governed by law and nothing else • Want to get as close as you can • Always looking forward in government  • Beccaria is concerned about the abuse of power • Comes when government acts in a manor that they don’t have the manor to act in • Government only exists because of us • Political justice is the justice that comes out of man made law  • For political justice to be just, the substance of the law must change over time because we  change  • If not, it is injustice  • Substance is the material thing that goes into it (Do not kill, Do not steal) • Meaning of the value that you give to that law • Form­ how is that prohibition clearly laid out before hand  • Beccaria has a lot to say about crime • His concerns about crime are really concerns about security and order  • Crime • “One may discern a scale of misdeeds wherein the highest degree consists of acts that are  directly destructive of society and the lowest of the least possible injustice against one of  its individual members. Between these extremes lie all actions that contrary to the public  good, which are called crimes, and they diminish imperceptibly from the highest to the  lowest.” • Differentiate between the gravity of crime  • Gravity of crime depends the amount of people if effects  • Crime is something special in the sense that it carries with it serious consequences • There are two types of consequences are the punishments and stigma  • We are constituted by the fact that we are either a criminal or not  • Have to deal with the punishment and the stigma  • Need to be careful with what we label crime  • Early modern England, reputation is very important  • Prior to 1829 there was no public police force  • Character of people accusing others of crimes is extremely important  • As soon as you label someone a criminal, their reputation goes down hill  • Need to be careful when we label people are criminals  • Highest form of crime is treason (kill or over throw government)  • In todays society, the worst possible thing you could do is an act of terrorism  • Severity of crime must match punishment  • The high end and low end of misdeeds cannot be labeled as crimes and should not be  treated as such • Calling everything crime could be an injustice because it is too harsh and the stigma of  calling someone a criminal  • The treat something that is much more harmful as a crime, as a crime is also an injustice  • The injustice will reflect the administration of the sanction that you give up and the stigma  • First to talk specifically about crime  • Crime between the two middle lines  • As you move along the scale, the punishment must increase • To label something as a crime on the low end is an injustice  • Injustice to public good to label so
More Less

Related notes for CRM1301

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit