Class Notes (835,937)
Canada (509,515)
Criminology (2,472)
CRM2300 (281)
Lecture

CRM 2300 B.txt

13 Pages
141 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Criminology
Course
CRM2300
Professor
Vajmeh Tabibi
Semester
Fall

Description
CRM 2300 B  Introduction to Canadian Criminal Law  (NOTE: learn complete definitions for exams)  Law­Law is the body of rules that regulates the conduct of members of society and is recognized and  enforced by the government.   Functions of law: Determines the structure of our government and assigns duties and powers to its various  branches  Other forms which moderate our conduct are societal norms, religion, educational systems,   Why does law exists­ protects rights, creates obligations, determines how the government assigns duty to  various branches, in itself creates societal norms,   Classes of Law:  1) Public Law: consists of the rules that govern the relations among various branches of the government  and between the government and private citizen (three categories of public law, constitutional law, criminal  law, administrative law), Federal, Provincial, Municipal,   2) Private Law: is concerned with he regulation of the relationships that exist among individual members of  society. Eg, tort law  Constitution Law: deals with the allocation of powers between the various provinces/territories of Canada  Criminal Law: deals with crimes, commission of crime is treated as wrong against society as a whole  Administrative Law: deals with he relationship between the state and individual citizens, and regulates the  activities of government agencies  Where does the Canadian Criminal Law com from?  1) Legislation: statute law  2) Judicial Decisions (common law): body of judge­made law that evolved in areas that were not covered by  legislation  If there is a conflict between the statute law and the common law, which one will overrule the other?  ­Statute law, is a peace of law brought in by a member of parliament, the reason for the hierarchy is  because it is codified (supremacy of the government)  Based on Constitution Act 1867 enacting criminal law falls under the exclusive jurisdiciton of the Parliament  of Canada  Federal criminal law power: this exclusive jurisdictions in the field of criminal law and the procedures  relating to criminal matters  What is Crime?  1) Prohibition: Conduct that is prohibited because it is considered to have an evil or injurious or undesirable  effect upon the public  2) Penalty: A penalty that may be imposed than the prohibition is violated  Both elements must be present in order for an act to be considered crime,   The limit to the criminal law power:  Does that mean that the parliament of Canada can pass legislation on any issue that it chooses and justify  it on the bases that because it contains both a prohibition and penalty, it must be criminal law?  Third factor: behavior that is having an injurious effect upon the Canadian public.  ­Hydro­Quebec (1997)  ­Charge with dumping of highly toxic material in Quebec river  ­The accused contended that the provisions of the Act were unconstitutional because they did not represent  a valid exercise of the federal criminal law power  ­Supreme court decision­­>charged initially for illegal dumping,  SCC upheld the conviction, as the dumping  caused a public health risk for the province of Quebec,   Reference re Firearm Act (2000)  The government of Alberta lunched a constitutionalists challenge that the new firearm Act represented an  intrusion into the province's jurisdiction to regulate private property.   ­SCC decision­­>upheld conviction as owning a firearm where a crime (federal) takes place becomes a  criminal matter, therefore under federal jurisdiction,   Lecture two  Overview of the Canadian Criminal Process  Substantive Criminal Law  3 levels of court, provincial (territorial, deals with he majority of cases in Canada), superior (indictable  offences), and appeal court , looks at two things, 1) If the process was fair, eg: two years ago a man drown  his two daughters and wife in the Kingston canal, appeal isn't wither he is guilty or not guilty but rather the  process, 3rd, Supreme Court of Canada, highest courts, makes amendment to criminal code  Substantive Criminal Law  ­Defines the nature of various criminal offences such as murder  ­Specifies carious legal elements to be resent before a conviction can be entered against an accused  person  ­It define some of the nature and scope of various defence (provocation, duress other two defences, self  defence and necessity are based on Common Law)  eg, If you don't follow the procedure set out in Substantive law, the outcome of the entire trial may vary,   Eg, Case, In 1988 or 1998 R vs Feeney, committed first degree murder, when he came back from the  murder, he took off his bloody shirt and took a nap, while napping, police who knew about this crime,   approached his trailer, kicked through the window, saw bloody shirt and murder weapon, arrest charge  Feeney,  Since the police did not follow the legal element of a judge issued warrant, Feeny had a defence,  and was let go do to lack of process,   Procedural Criminal Law  ­Outlines the procedures to be followed in the prosecution of a criminal case   ­The categorization of offences  ­The procedures as to whether the cases to be treated as summary or indictable or dual  ­Defines the nature and scope of the powers of criminal justice officials,   Categories of Crime  1) Summary Conviction Offences  ­Definition: offences are tried rapidly and within the provincial/territorial court  ­tried before a provincial/territorial court judge  ­Penalty: Maximum penalty is a fine of $2000 or 6 months prison or both  ­Examples: falsifying employment record, wilful indecent act in public, causing a disturbance  ­defendant (accused) or dismissed  2) Indictable Offences  ­Definition: the most serious criminal offences  ­Tried: more than one court procedures  ­Preliminary inquirer: a provincial/territorial court judge decides whether there is sufficient evidence to put  the accused on trial  ­Examples: murder, manslaughter, sexual assault with a weapon, robbery, theft over $5000  3) Hybrid or Dual Offences:  ­Definition: Crown prosecutor has the power of discretion to proceed by way of indictment or summary  conviction.  ­Are tried by summary convictions  ­Example: sexual assault, assault, theft under $5000  The Impact of Charter of Rights and Freedoms on the Criminal Law in Canada  ­Empowers judges  ­Morgentaler, Smolig and Scott (1988)                  ­Vary first challenge to the charter   Supreme court struck down section 287 of the CC (regulating the performance of abortion in Canada)  Section 287 infringed section 7 of the Charter  Section 287 was not salvaged by section 1  He was a doctor living in Montreal (1974), abortion was not legal in Canada, but was legal if it was done  outside of a hospital, so if a women wanted an abortion in Canada, she had to go to the family doctor, and  the doctor had to write a letter saying that there was something wrong with the fetus,   Morgentaler, opened up an office and illegally provided abortions to women,   The Charter of Rights and Freedom  ­Section 1) The Canadian charter of rights and freedom guarantees the rights and freedom set out in the  subjects only to such reasonable  limits prescribed by law as can be demonstrably justified in a free and  democratic society.  Section 7) Everyone has the right to life, liberty, and security of the person and the right not to be deprived  thereof except in accordance with he principle of fundamental justice.   Readings a Case Citation  R. refers to Rex (king or Rigina (Queen))  v. versus, or against  Tabibi name of the Accused or defendant  4 (number) is the volume number  CCC abbreviated series number   222 page number  (SCC) court that decided the case  September 20th   The Actus Reus Elements of a Criminal Offence  Introduction  Actus non facit neum nisi mens sit rea  Meaning: an act does not render a person guilty of a cirminal offence unless his or her mind is also guilty,   1. Actus reaus, a particular event or state of affairs was caused by the accused conduct  2. Mens reas: the conduct was accompanied by a certain state of mind,   Actus Reus and Mens Reus  Why is it important to focus on the actus reus elements of criminal offence?  The existence of actus reus=intervention of the CJS  To be held criminally responsible: crown must prove beyond reasonable doubt all the necessary actus reus  elements  The existence of mens rea does not lead to convictions  Actus reus and mens rea must coincide  Example... state should punish people for their overt action rather than their wicked intentions (p. 22)  Actus Reus  There are three element of actus reus of a criminal offense:  1) Conduct: a voluntary act or omission constituting the central feature of the crime  2) Circumstances: the surroundings and material  3) The Consequences: of the voluntary conduct  Defining the Elements of Acts Reus  Example : assault causing bodily harm  First define the crime based on CC  1) Defining assault : s 265 (1) (a) of the Code  2) Find the provision in the code that refers  to the offence of assault causing bodily harm: S. 267 of the  Code  3) Define bodily harm in s. 2 in the Code,   Defining the elements of actus Reus  Defining assault : s. 265 1 a of the code  A person commits an assault when  (a) without the consent of another person he applies force intentionally to that other person, directly or  indirectly....  Definining the Elements of actus reus  ­The provision in the code that refers to the offence of assault causing bodily harm. S. 267 of the Code  1) Everyone who, in committing n assault  a) carries uses or threaten to use a weapon or imitation thereof or  b) causes bodily harm to the complainant is guilty of an indictable offence,   Defining bodily harm s. 2 of the Code                  Bodily harm means any hurt or injury to a person that interfere with the heath or comfort of   the   person and that is more than transient or trifling in nature....  Three Elements of Actus reaus of the offence of assault causing bodily harm  Conduct: The application of the force to the victim  Circumstances: the force was applie
More Less

Related notes for CRM2300

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit