Class Notes (835,045)
Canada (508,888)
Criminology (2,472)
CRM2300 (281)
Lecture

nov 19.docx

4 Pages
57 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Criminology
Course
CRM2300
Professor
Valerie Steeves
Semester
Fall

Description
CRM 2300 Nov. 19 Not Criminally Responsible on Account of Mental Disorder 1. 1843 M’Naghten Rules – s. 16 CCC 2.   a. Mental Disorder – Cooper b. Makes D incapable of Appreciating – Barnier, Cooper c. Nature and quality of D’s acts – Kjeldsen, Swain d. Or knowing acts are wrong  3. Disposition  No = yes (what P  Pappajohn Honest but unr.  Reject his clam thinks) s. 265 (4) Mistake of fact = no  MR No = ? Sansregret “ Willful blindness for  s. 273.1,.2 2  trip No = Park Exceptions Required air of  reality ie. Evidence  to support his claim No = no, silence =  Ewanchuk “ Required positive  not yes affirmation of  consent Yes doesn’t = yes JA “ Restricts V’s  freedom to consent In JA: ­ Courts splits 6:3 ­ Legislation requires ongoing conscious consent to ensure safety of sexual assault,  and to ensure the individuals have the ability to stop the consent at any point –  sometimes the provision Parliament created may seem unrealistic (s. 273.1,.2)  R v Ladue (1965) YTCA ­ How honest does honest have to be ­ Walking on the outside of town, pretty drunk ­ Sees a shack with a woman sleeping on the floor  ­ Decides he wants to go in and rape her ­ Has sex with her and passes out on the floor beside her  ­ Cops find him the next day and when they wake him up, he finds out she was  dead all along ­ When dead, she is no longer a woman, she became a body/corpse  ­ So he did not commit the AR of rape  ­ Falls under interference with a dead body (necrophilia)   o Improperly OR indecently interfering or offering an indignity to a dead  human body or human remains  o MR is knowledge or recklessness – he thought he was raping her and she  was alive  o Gets convicted of the Interference (all of it ^^) ­ Results oriented judicial making example  o How AR and MR don’t fit, but there is still that level of blameworthiness  so they want to convict him of something  1. M’Naghten (1843) UK ­ Heard voices in his head and wouldn’t leave him alone – no sleep, no eating ­ Came to believe the Prime Minister had ordered these voices to torture him ­ PM Sir Robert Peel  ­ Wanted to kill the PM because he can’t handle the voices ­ Ends up shooting and killing the PM’s secretary Edward Drummond  ­ Gets charged with murder  ­ Court says that when someone is incapable of making these rational decisions,  they can’t be blameworthy – if not blameworthy, can’t convict them  ­ Instead, they detain him at the King’s pleasure (an asylum)  ­ S. 16  ­ In 1843, insanity was related to evil – he was put it in Bedlam (biggest asylum in  London) ­ In the 1970s, there is a treatment model, where it is seen as an illness – medicine  pathologized certain behaviours (deviance of these behaviours)  ­ In the 2000s, it went back to being evil (Paul Bernardo for example)  Mental Disorder (a) 1. Is the accused suffering from a mental disorder? * Cooper (1980) SCC ­ Outpatient at Hamilton Psychiatric Hospital ­ Lives in community, goes
More Less

Related notes for CRM2300

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit