Class Notes (834,037)
Canada (508,290)
Criminology (2,468)
CRM2305 (97)
Lecture 2

Lecture 2.doc

5 Pages
78 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Criminology
Course
CRM2305
Professor
Carolyn Gordon
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 2­ Tuesday January 15, 2013 Defining Police Related Concepts • The Evolution of Police Work: Canada • Early Days­ Community residents responsible for law enforcement • Policing was diverse across Canada: Militia captains (under the traditional French system,  Justice of Peace and Constable in Upper Canada) • 1793: the Parish and Town Officer Act: appointment of constables for each district  • Constables duties: drunkenness, prostitution, order, etc.  • Constitution Act says that each province has a responsibility to create its own police force • Duty of each province to create its own police force, but to also create federal statute law  • Initially, North West Mounted Police (1873) to police Rupert Land, Military style police force • Became the RCMP­ 1920 • Public opposition to expansion  • Most widely recognized symbol of Canada • Many internal difficulties in the early days • Used for political reasons (Winnipeg General Strike of 1919) • Challenges in providing policing in the remote North  • First started because they needed to police the Northern and Western part of Canada  • RCMP was a part of the gold rush­ Gold rush era in Canada, Americans and other people  from the south, rush towards the Gold, the gold belonged to Canada, had to secure their  resources (Thought RCMP was created for the gold rush)  • Based on a military style, their red jackets signifies the colour of the military   • Origin of the word Police • Greek words “politeuein”: to engage in political activity or to be a citizen • And “polis”: means states or city  • The origins of the word illustrate: the link between the individual and the political process,  as police organizations stands between the citizen and the states  • Definitions • Police as an institution/: “The public police” is a non military individual or organization who  are given the right by government to use coercive force, if necessary, within the public  realm • Policing as an activity: activities of any individual or organization acting legally on behalf of  public or private organizations or persons to maintain security or social order while  empowered by either public or private contract, regulations or policies, written or verbal  • Public police: are individuals employed, trained and paid for by government whose  objective is to enforce government laws • Private police: individuals employed by organization (bank, university, shopping malls or  an individual to serve a specific purpose)  • The Legislative Framework of Police • Constitution Act, 1867: Sets out the responsibility of the federal and provincial  governments in the area of Criminal Justice • Criminal code: sets out the criminal laws and procedures • Other federal statues: Anti terrorism act, the Canadian youth justice act, the Canadian  evidence act • Provincial and municipal legislation Ex­ highway traffic acts, liquor acts • RCMP acts: provides the legislative framework for the operation of the RCMP  • The Structure of Canadian Police • Federal Police: RCMP • Police provinces and municipalities under contract • Peacekeeping  • Provincial Police: police rural and areas outside municipalities  • Municipal police: Constitute two thirds of the police personnel in the country • First nation police  • Theoretical Underpinning • Three major prospective in sociology: • 1) Functionalism­ • 2) Conflict­ Marx theory  • 3) Interactionism  • Functionalist Perspective • Focus: How societies develop and maintain social order • Every element (rules, language, religious beliefs) and institution (family, education, law)  serve the need of the society for survival • Crime is: dysfunctional because it harms others and violates expectations of orderly  behaviour  • Anything that is not functional is dysfunctional • Society operates in an interdependent manner: change in once aspect of society will result  in changes in other parts of social structure • Why society needs police? • 1) To prevent crime • 2) To detect crime and apprehend offender • 3) To maintain order in the community in accordance with the rule of the law  • The underlying assumption of Functionalist Perspective are: • 1) Assumes society is homogenous • 2) Assumes society is ruled by law • 3) Assumes laws are impartially enforced • 4) A political police force  • Political police force­ does not take side with the government, sides with the law, which  makes society function, impossible to have a political police force  • Two outcomes of the functionalist perspective:  • 1) Manifest function: Obvious and intended function • 2) Latent function: less obvious and often unanticipated: employment off officers and  civilian staff • Who are the proponents of this perspectives? • Many traditional criminologist • Most government commissions • CJS • The Police organiz
More Less

Related notes for CRM2305

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit