Class Notes (837,009)
Canada (510,037)
Criminology (2,472)
CRM3312 (86)
Lecture

Oct 8.docx

6 Pages
95 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Criminology
Course
CRM3312
Professor
Kenneth Campbell
Semester
Fall

Description
Right to privacy in juvenile justice proceedings: legislation • Youth criminal justice act: court proceedings continue to be open to the public and press • Publication of name is banned, unless: o Youth receives an adult sentence o Court allows it, taking into account the importance of rehabilitation  Kid at large • Threat to himself or others International agreements – Canada follows • Protect a juvenile’s right to privacy, in order to avoid harm through publicity and labeling. Including: o Bejing Rules  o United nations convention on the rights of the child Right to Privacy: rationale • Proponents of publications argue (in favour): o 1. Societal protection would be better served, through increased information  Protect your children from them  Could maybe help other victims come forward  Would also need to know she’s guilty, sentenced, and where she is living when  she is released to protect yourself  Weakens this argument  Unrealistic to expect the media will report on that o 2. Enhanced deterrent effect on youth  Deterrence doesn’t really work  Kids act on impulse  What about the attention seeking ones that want their name published? o Unrealistic to expect the public would even remember the girl in 2 years Myths about Youth Crime • Media are an important source of common misperceptions about crime o Come excepted to be true because they are always repeated • Media reporting fosters unrealistic fears • Factors influence crime news selection: o Seriousness of offence o Unusual elements o Sentimental aspects of offence o Involvement of famous persons  Police officer • Always first degree if you kill a police officer o Vocabulary conveys message that crime must be “fought” rather than “solved” o Criminal acts will be publicized if:  Unusual  Increased number of victims  Multiple offenders  Victims are elderly, female, children or affluent Moral Panics (Cohen, 1974) • Creating moral outrage through: o Negative images in the media o Public outcry leading to harsher treatment • Cohen was one of the first criminologists that looked at how media influences things • Cohen demonstrated a moral panic in the UK in 1970s (mods and rockers) • Police overreacted, mediate perpetuated threat Moral Panic (Goode & Ben­Yehuda. 1996): • Heightened level 
More Less

Related notes for CRM3312

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit