Class Notes (835,116)
Canada (508,936)
Criminology (2,472)
CRM3312 (86)
Lecture

Sept 10.docx

5 Pages
35 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Criminology
Course
CRM3312
Professor
Kenneth Campbell
Semester
Fall

Description
Historical Perspectives on Justice in  Canada Separate systems of Justice • Youth and adults should not be held accountable in the same way • In Canada­ treatment has evolved significantly, recognition of special needs and limitations • Adolescence – a distinctive stage of development – many physical, psychological, social, intellectual  challenges occurring o Trying to learn who they are o Hormones o Testing limits, how far can they go o Most have broken the law in some way (ex: drinking) o Lack judgement and maturity • Three stages of criminal accountability: o Childhood – birth to 11 – no criminal liability o Adolescence – 12 to 17 – limited accountability o Adults – 18 and up – full legal accountability YCJA separate system of justice • YCJA premised on belief that youth is similar to a state of “diminished responsibility similar to those lacking  criminal intent”  • Lack fully developed sense of moral judgement • Lack intellectual capacity to appreciate fully the consequences of their acts • May lack empathy for victims bc of under developed maturity • They make poor criminals and are easier to apprehend Rationale for a separate system of justice • Lack judgement and knowledge to participate in the court process • They are more vulnerable than adults o Easier to intimidate o Easy to manipulate them • They are more amenable to rehabilitation o Not everyone and in every instance o More emphasis on rehabilitation o More intervention oriented • Youth could be corrupted by exposure to adult offenders in jail/ prisons o Still happens in youth custody sometimes o Youth can assault other kids but it’s much more likely by adults • YCJA provides that youth should not receive a greater punishment than adults convicted of the same  offence in similar circumstances Early perspectives th • Early doctrine held that youth and adults committing crimes: (19  century) o Had the same intent o Were similarly responsible o Treated in the same way o Received same punishments • Offender must have violated a law (actus reus) and possess criminal intent (mens rea) o They need to know what they are doing Doli Incapax • Means incapacity to do wrong • Legal doctrine that recognized a lack of maturity (aged 7­14) and immunity from prosecution • If court could demonstrate that youth could differentiate right from wrong, accused could stand trial o If they could understand good from evil o If they could understand right from wrong o Many child were given adults sentences • Over 14 were criminally responsible, under 7 were immune from prosecution Children in adult institutions • Mid­late 19  century, youth were housed with adults in deplorable conditions • Bad living conditions • Brown commission (1849) examined prison conditions and criticize
More Less

Related notes for CRM3312

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit