Class Notes (835,518)
Canada (509,217)
Criminology (2,472)
CRM3312 (86)
Lecture

Oct 31.docx

12 Pages
122 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Criminology
Course
CRM3312
Professor
Kenneth Campbell
Semester
Fall

Description
Community­based responses to youth crime: cautioning, conferencing and extrajudicial  measures Rationale for Diversion • JDA – no provisions for dealing with diversion, but widely used • Theoretical rationale: labelling theory o Once you label them as deviant, they become deviant • Empirical research is equivocal • Value of diversion programs – faster, less costly, community has a role • Less likely to reoffend if we divert them in the beginning Alternative Measures under the Young Offenders Act • Possible exam question: Which legislation statutory introduced legislative framework * YOA (not sure that’s  what she said) • Legislative framework • For first time, minor offenders, with no history of offending • Quebec used diversion most, least restrictive policies o Already were doing it before the act o Have youth protection act o Child and family services act • Ontario: resisted implementation o Thought research was ambiguous so why should they do it o Concern with net­widening, abuse of rights • Ontario was forced to enact diversion o Following R. v. S (G) ? and R. v. Askov – trial within a reasonable time, established criteria. Made  them want diversion to avoid this problem o Most restrictive policies (post­charge, narrow eligibility criteria, lowest use) • Context for increasing use of diversion: o Rates of youth crime falling, concern increasing o “get tough” approach to youth crime Extrajudicial measures under the YCJA • Extrajudicial measures and sanctions • Have new names  ­ really just alternative measures • Didn’t want to keep sending kids to custody • Includes informal and formal diversion and place discretion not to charge  • Sanctions = new terms for alternative measures – type of extrajudicial measures • Sec 4. Creates a presumption of use for youth with no record, minor offence o Mandatory if there is no record • Should be: o Informal, restorative o Encourage responsibility of youth  Not an admission of guilt o Engage families and communities • Youth does not have a right to be dealt with outside of formal court system • Police screening: dealing with youth informally by warning o Least intrusive • Warning or caution, take into account: o Seriousness of offence, prior record o Attitude of youth, views of victim • Caution is more formal than a warning, administered by police or in letter o Could involve referral to social agency o No admission of guilt • Subsequent legal proceedings, court can be informed youth had prior participation • Considered indicative of failure of less formal response to have an effect • Less likely to use discretion not to charge for minorities Youth Justice Committees • Monitor, support youth justice system • Administer alternative measures • Used to be able to volunteer to be on the committee • YCJA – practice continues, members paid • Advise governments on how to improve the system • Provide info to public, co­ordinate systems, deal with under 12s Youth Justice Conferences • Inspired by family group conferences • Based on traditional aboriginal practices • Conference: a group of persons convened to give advice concerning a specific youth in trouble with the  law o Family members of victim and offender, social worker, community, etc • Includes: o Extrajudicial sanctions, sentencing circles  Anyone can talk regarding the impact of crime on them o Recommendations not binding to the court  recommendations from conference doesn’t need to be followed by judge many judges  alter recommendation Extrajudicial sanctions under the YCJA • Pre­charge/ post­charge – provincial policy regulates referral • Youth meets with agency, accepts responsibility, agrees to plan, parents notified • Youth must: write an essay, do community work, make a donation to charity • Some programs aimed at “underlying circumstances” – counselling/ treatment • Victim involvement – informed about process, often invited to be involved o Most of the time victims don’t want to be involved – they just want to move on o Victims of young offenders are also usually youth and might be afraid o Need to be conducted with sensitivity o Can be an apology, services to the victim • Aboriginal communities: many have extrajudicial sanctions programs based on restorative ideals Role and rights of youth regarding extrajudicial sanctions • Considerable pressure for youth to participate o Cost less o Processed quickly o Less intimidating • Fewer legal protections exist o Don’t have a lawyer • Youth must accept moral responsibility for the act, discuss circumstances of the offence, and be advised of  right to legal representation Consequences of participating in extrajudicial sanctions • Completion – cannot proceed to court • Incomplete – may be referred to court o Can go to custody • Partial completion – judge has discretion to dismiss charges or take into account half is completed and move  on from there • Law allows a two year period of access to records of extrajudicial sanctions when youth is convicted of  another offence Aboriginal Youth and the criminal justice system General Demographics of aboriginal youth • 2010 close to 1,000,000 aboriginal people • Teenage pregnancy very common • Overcrowding reservations • 3.3% of population (jump of 22% from 1996) • One third of aboriginal youth under 14 years old • Saskatchewan: median age of aboriginals 18. 5 years (38.8 years for non­aboriginals) • More than twice as likely to live in poverty • Almost half live in urban centers – mainly cities in the prairies Characteristics of aboriginal youth crime • 1999­ aboriginal youth accounted for nearly ¼ of youth admissions to custody (yet they represent only 7% of  population) • More pronounced in the prairies (Manitoba custody admissions 75% aboriginal, although only 16% of  population) • Greater chance of going to jail than graduating from high school • Over­representation among victims (35% f aboriginals vs. 26% non), 3xs more likely to be victims of violent  crime • Violence occurs in aboriginal communities, victims are aboriginal • High prevalence of family violence, linked to later victimization and criminal activity • Loss of aboriginal identity – negative attitudes may contribute towards increased pathology • RCAP – impact of residential school and child welfare system is significant • Kingsley & mark (2000) – found disproportionate percentages of aboriginal youth involved in the sex trade • Barriers to exiting sex trade: no support, difficult to leave families Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) • An organic brain disorder when fetus is exposed to a certain amount of alcohol • Prevalence in aboriginal communities 25­200 per 1000 births; 1­10 per 1000 births non­aboriginal  communities • Chartrand & forbes­chilibeck (2003); found half of the cases studied had FASD (youth) • Youth were sentenced for crimes that involved compromised abilities to control behaviour due to FASD • Not a lot of resources for kids like this • They will not learn by punishing them • Youth suffering from FASD are at risk of behaving inappropriately and increased likelihood to commit crimes • A lot of the time judges don’t even know the kids have it • Courts are frustrated, as there are few options available, except incarceration • Youth with FASD are highly vulnerable to victimization, more likely to be in conflict with the law Causes of aboriginal youth criminal involvement • More indirect • Impact of colonization as most significant factor. Also rapid social change, family breakdown, poverty and  economic marginalization, losses, learned patterns of self­destructive behaviour, (cultural trauma) o Intergenerational effects • Youth crime is the result of social conditions (green and healy, 2003) • Criminal justice system used too often to solve social problems – expensive default • Many charges against aboriginal youth involve lifestyle offences (breach in conditions: don’t hang out with  someone, curfew, etc) • Social problems in the home impact on a
More Less

Related notes for CRM3312

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit