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Lecture 12

ENG 1100 Lecture Notes - Lecture 12: Proofreading


Department
English
Course Code
ENG 1100
Professor
Hazel Atkins
Lecture
12

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ENG1100 – Introduction to Essay Writing
November 26, 2015
Revising and Editing
DO NOT EDIT THE SAME DAY YOU WROTE IT. PREFERABLY 48 HOURS
READ IT OUTLOUD
Conciseness
Getting right to the point
- Avoiding any phrases or repetitions that stop the essay/paragraph from moving
forward
- Avoiding digressions, repetitions, irrelevant information
- Writing in a way that allows no room for doubt in your reader’s mind
- The papers you write in English do not have headings, subheadings, graphs or charts.
Your language is all there is to go on.
Revising, Editing, and Proof-Reading
Start by revising your work at the ‘global’ level first – revise/re-read the work as a whole
Next move to examine the different sections of the essay – editing at the paragraph level.
Finally, proof-read at the sentence level for grammar, spelling and errors
Revision at the Global Level
Emphasis is on the major writing concerns
- Focus of the essay
Editing at the Paragraph Level
Each Section clearly develops and argues one of the main points of the essay
Each section makes adequate use of research material to support the point – and
documents this information properly
Each section links back to the main idea of the paper
The sections are connected to one another by transitional sentences.
Proof-Reading
Proof-reading is aimed at correcting the following problem
- Grammar
- Word usage
- Punctuation
- Spelling
- Capitalization
- Missing words or letters
- Layout problems
- Other mechanical problems
Strategies for proof-reading
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