Class Notes (836,136)
Canada (509,645)
English (950)
ENG2450 (10)
Lecture

THE SCARLET LETTER

2 Pages
130 Views
Unlock Document

Department
English
Course
ENG2450
Professor
Bernhard Radloff
Semester
Winter

Description
THE SCARLET LETTER ­opening focuses on community ­human and physical nature: demonism Marketplace ­goodwives: Hester is full of sin, bored with harsh punishment, think Hester’s punishment not severe enough ­A stands for adultery, power system of law, affects Hester’s psychology, law and spirit, love, or freedom ­Hester’s relationship with baby, Pearl: could be seen as Madonna, or simply sinner ­Hawthorne gives many perspectives; reality offers multiple interpretations—conflict of interpretation ­Catholicism: orthodox interpretation ­Protestantism: direct access to word of God, anyone that has access, thus many parts of the church X The Leach and His Patient ­relationship between Dimmesdale & Chillingworth ­Dimmesdale is sick and Chillingsworth is his doctor; they have a friend and doctor­patient relationship ­Chillingsworth suspects that Dimmesdale’s sickness is just psychological and wants to be told what caused the  sickness (it is important that he says why he’s sick in order to be cured) Pg. 88: “ “Yet some men bury their secrets thus,” observed the calm physician. “ ­buried secrets are the basis of the plot, and it is Chillingsworth’s mission to dig up secret ­guilt complex is the basis of original sin ­Chillingsworth makes Dimmesdale sicker by making him constantly aware of his guilt, then at the end both die ­Dimmesdale’s response is that some people keep things to themselves but it doesn’t mean they’re guilty; by  continuing to work as minister he can redeem his past ­Dimmesdale may deceive himself because he believes his own argument Pg. 91: “Thus, a sickness,” continued Roger Chillingsworth, going on, in an unaltered tone, without heeding the  interruption,­­but standing up, and confronting the emaciated and white­cheeked minister, with his low, dark, and  misshapen figure,­­ “a sickness, a sore place, if we may so call it, in your spirit, hath immediately its appropriate  manifestation in your bodily frame.  Would you, therefore, that you physician heal the bodily evil?  How may this  be, unless you first lay open to him the wound or trouble in your soul?” ­Chillingsworth says directly to Dimmesdale that he has a sickness in his soul that can’t be helped until  Dimmesdale tells ­Dimmesdale isn’t required to confess to God or do a public confession XIII Another View of Hester ­community now views Hester as comforting and kind because she’s very helpful in the community ­when the meaning of the letter transforms; new social, communal views of 
More Less

Related notes for ENG2450

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit