Class Notes (836,219)
Canada (509,690)
Philosophy (1,795)
PHI1370 (52)
Lecture

2. Moral Principles in Health Care

4 Pages
115 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHI1370
Professor
Ken Ferguson
Semester
Winter

Description
Moral Principles in Health Care The Five Principles Approach to Medical Ethics: ­ Utility ­ Autonomy ­ Non­Maleficence ­ Beneficence ­ Justice Moral Theories – are put forward as a complete description and explanation of right and  wrong, mean to hold always, and can never be overridden. Moral Principles – are less comprehensive than moral theories; they are relevant  considerations in a broad range of situations but might be overridden by some other  principle or value Moral Rules – even narrower than principles, e.g. “tell the truth”, “keep your promises”  Ross and the Five Principles Approach: Note the similarity between the five principles approach to ethics in health care and  Ross’s Ethics: Both approaches reject the idea that there is a single, underlying characteristic or property  that all right acts share (that makes them right) and a single property that all wrong acts  share (that makes them wrong)  This position is referred to as “pluralism” in ethics Autonomy: Concerns the extent to which a person has control over his or her life and actions Main Issues: Why is autonomy good, or valuable, or important? What exactly is autonomy? What’s so great about autonomy? Instrumental value – the utilitarian perspective ­ Each person better able to know, and control, her own happiness ­ People derive satisfaction from controlling their lives ­ Individuality leads to new ideas, knowledge, etc, which benefits humanity Intrinsic value – the Kantian perspective ­ the ability to act autonomously is good in itself, autonomy is “what makes us  unique/human” ­ Those character traits we regard as virtues presuppose autonomy, example,  courage, generosity, loyalty, morality itself A third view ­ Human Rights. Regardless of the value or importance of autonomy, each person  has the right to control his or her own life. What is it to be autonomous? The Negative Concept of Freedom: Some philosophers define freedom as the “absence of external constraints” Roughly, external constraints intervene between our desires and our actions so as to  prevent us from doing what we want. Meaning, if there are no external constraints on you, you are perfectly free The case of the drug addict: ­ He wants to be free of drugs b/c they are ruining his life, but his physical  addiction is so powerful that he is unable to stop taking them ­ Is the drug addict autonomous? The negative concept of freedom seems to imply  that he is ­ The idea of internal constraints? The negative concept overlooks free will: ­ We have a decision­making faculty – the will ­ External constraints do not affect the freedom of a person’s will. They just prevent  us from doing what we freely decide to do ­ But sometimes a person’s decision­making faculty is not under his/her control –  here internal constraints undermine or destroy the freedom of her will The Double Decker (Hierarchical) Theory: ­ “Autonomy is a second­order capacity to reflect critically upon one’s first­order  preferences and desires, and the ability to either identify with these or to change  them in light of higher­order preferences and values. By exercising such a  capacity we define our nature, give meaning and coherence to our lives, and take  responsibility for the kind of person we are.” ­ Gerald Dworkin, “Autonomy and Informed Consent” Distinction Between 1  order desires – ordinary desires for things in the world nd 2  order desires – are desires that are in some way about other desires So, autonomy requires: 1) Having higher order desires/preferences 2) Having the ability to evaluate your first­order desires, and resist t
More Less

Related notes for PHI1370

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit