Class Notes (835,638)
Canada (509,305)
Philosophy (1,795)
PHI2396 (339)
Lecture

Health Care Professional

12 Pages
77 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHI2396
Professor
Don't Know
Semester
Fall

Description
Health Care Professional­Patient relationship  10/10/2013 Dilemmas of Scott Starson If he admits to serious illness, he will be treated against his will If he denies it, doctors will conclude that he doesn’t recognize his illness and treat him With treatment, he could recover and be released from psychiatric institution but he will lose his creativity Or he can stay institutionalized but retain his creativity. Doctor­Patient relationship Doctors are required to do the best for their patients and respect dignity Ethical commitment to make sick whole Acknowledge patients are often vulnerable Must still respect dignity Goal of medicine debate Prevention of death Alleviation of suffering Optimize life Prevention of disease Maximize patients own goals Differences on how to characterize doctor­ patient relationship Physicians or doctors or patients Health care workers and clients Health care providers and consumers Alfred Tauber Doctor and patient suggests a relationship based on calling of which the core principle lies an ethical  commitment to make each of us whole when diseased Not like other professions Characterizing relationship as one of providers and clients or consumers Calling patients clients obscures vulnerability Talking about providers and consumers implies health care is a commercial exchange with minimal ethical  obligations Tauber: Terminology suggests that the norms of the marketplace are what should govern the practice of medicine,  and leaves little space for the committed and caring relationships that seem integral to sound medical  practice. Models of Doctor­Patient relationship Engineering (veatch) Paternalistic (veatch) Contractual (veatch) Convenantal (may) Engineering model Doctors are considered as applied scientists who must deal with facts and divorce themselves from  questions of value Role of physicians to present facts and let patients make their own decisions Does not give ethical model Fails due to value judgments  Unfair to ask doctors to leave value judgments out of medical treatment Doctors cannot just follow patient wishes (can be harmful to patient) States that medicine is merely a domain of facts Paternalistic model Doctors make decisions about health care and patient follows Like a parent Was used Permits doctor to lie or conceal information about diagnosis and prognosis Too much power to physicians and no respect given 3 flawed assumptions goals of medicine are clear so that doctors know whats best for patients giving diagnosis and prognosis is an exact science all physicians are competent and know what is in their patients best interests places too much power in hands of physicians demonstrates lack of respect towards patient Cullen and Klein state: Treating humans with respect means recognizing their autonomy by allowing them the freedom to make  choices about their lives.  By contrast to disrespect people means taking away their freedom to live as they  choose. Contractual model Recognizes autonomy of patient Both doctor and patient has a role to play in decision making Both doctor and patient are obligated to share information By treating both as autonomous individuals, it might lose sight of vulnerability of patient and power  differentials between doctor and patient Covenantal model (William F. May) Emphasizes the reciprocity of doctor­patient relationship Argues that the doctor must be considered within the community (think professor) Requires doctors to excel beyond following rules, acknowledging rights and performing duties As narratives of illness point out, this model advocates an ongoing relationship between doctor and patient Emphasizes preventative medicine Nurse­Patient relationship Different ethical issues than doctors due to different places  Doctors cure and nurses care Nurse may have to lie to patient about placebo while physician doesn’t need to Must carry out doctors orders Delegitimized by doctors to gain power Moral distress Moral uncertainty Not sure what should be done instead Moral agency Imbalance of power and unable to act on moral beliefs Moral residue Long standing feelings of guilt Ethical dilemmas One of two courses of action that connot be both made Autonomy From greek autonomia: self­rule Childress and fletcher argue, modern biomedical ethics emerged out of concern that autonomy of patients  was not being respected Autonomy acts both as moral principle that can guide ethical decision making and as ideal for human  flourishing Two concepts Autonomy is valuable because it facilitates making good choices  Connects autonomy to achieving goals Even though debate over what are valuable goals Autonomy allows us to choose for ourselves, regardless of particular choices made Objection to this concept becaus
More Less

Related notes for PHI2396

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit