Class Notes (836,414)
Canada (509,777)
POL2103 (176)
Lecture

POL 2103 Lecture #11 .docx

13 Pages
65 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POL2103
Professor
Ivaylo Grouev
Semester
Fall

Description
POL 2103: Lecture #11  Nov 13  2012 Humanitarian Intervention:  Rwanda ­ 1994 800 000­ 1,000 000 killed…in only100 days  Preferred weapon   Machete  Srebrenica ­ 1995 Eastern Bosnia  8 000­ 10 000  Men/boys killed in 5 days  Preferred weapon  Machine gun  Summarizing the catastrophe in 1997, David Rohde ­ who as a journalist with the Christian Science  Monitor  won a Pulitzer Prize for uncovering the first mass graves around Srebrenica ­ offered a blistering  critique of the moral lapse on the part of the UN "safe area's" alleged guardians:  "The international community partially disarmed thousands of men, promised them they would be  safeguarded and then delivered them to their sworn enemies.  Srebrenica was not simply a case of the international community standing by as a far­off atrocity was  committed. The actions of the international community encouraged, aided, and emboldened the  executioners. ... The fall of Srebrenica did not have to happen. There is no need for thousands of skeletons  to be strewn across eastern Bosnia. There is no need for thousands of Muslim children to be raised on  stories of their fathers, grandfathers, uncles and brothers slaughtered by Serbs." Endgame  , pp.  351, 353.)  THE RESPONSIBILITY TO PROTECT: CORE PRINCIPLES (1) Basic Principles A. State sovereignty implies responsibility, and the primary responsibility for the protection of its people lies  with the state itself. B. Where a population is suffering serious harm, as a result of internal war, insurgency, repression or state failure, and the state in question is unwilling or unable to halt or  avert it, the principle of non­intervention yields to the international responsibility to protect. The history of “humanitarian” military intervention is replete with invocations of humanitarian intentions by  strong powers or coalitions in order to conceal their own geopolitical interests.  The United Nations charter prohibits nations from attacking other states to remedy claimed violations of  human rights.  The requirement that the Security Council must authorize any use of force to protect human rights is critical  to the maintenance of world peace and order.  The 1999 U.S.­led NATO air assault against Yugoslavia to halt human rights abuses in Kosovo has been  extolled by some  as a new model of humanitarian intervention.  President Clinton has argued that when a nation is committing gross human rights violations  against its citizens, other nations or multilateral coalitions have the right to intervene militarily, without the  authority of the UN Security Council, to end those abuses.  However, the United Nations charter clearly prohibits nations from attacking other states for  claimed violations of human rights. Article 2(4), the central provision of the charter, prohibits the “threat or use of force against” another  state. There are only two exceptions to this prohibition.  Article 51 allows a nation to use force in “self­defense if an armed attack occurs against” it or an  allied country.  The charter also authorizes the Security Council to employ force to counter threats to or breaches  of international peace. This has been interpreted to allow individual nations to militarily intervene for  humanitarian reasons, but only with the explicit authorization of the Security Council. This has occurred in  Somalia, Rwanda, Haiti, and Bosnia.  The idea of humanitarian intervention appeared during the Biafran War (1967­1970).  Large scale famine, widely covered in western press but totally ignored by government leaders in the name  of neutrality and non­intervention.  This situation lead to the creation of NGOs like Medecins Sans Frontieres, which defended the idea that  certain public health situations might justify the extraordinary action of calling into question the sovereignty  of states. The concept was developed at the end of the 1980s, notably by the French politician Bernard Kouchner.   Worked as a physician for the                                                                                               Red Cross in  Biafra in 1968                                                                                              (during the Nigerian Civil War).        founded MSF in 1971 Health Minister  in 1992­1993   Member of the European Parliament    State Secretary for Health from 1997 to 1999. Representing Administrator of the                                                                            United Nations in Kosovo  from 1999 to 2001 Defining humanitarian intervention is problematic. The only consensus is that… there is no consensus. To start with the use of force  in international law, the options can be categorized as follows: Individual and collective self­defense Intervention by the Security Council  Humanitarian intervention Defenders of humanitarian intervention justify it primarily in the name of a moral imperative:  "we should not let people die."  This idea is grounded in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, written in 1948. For these defenders,  intervention is only legitimate when it is motivated by a massive violation of human rights and when it is put  in motion by a supernational body, typically the United Nations Security Council.  Legal Ammunitions or Legal Obstacles: Article 2(7) of the Charter prohibits the UN from intervening in domestic affairs.  “Nothing contained in the present Charter shall authorize the United Nations to intervene in matters which  are essentially within the domestic jurisdiction of any state or shall require the Members to submit such  matters to settlement under the present Charter; but this principle shall not prejudice the application of  enforcement measures under Chapter Vll.” Therefore, action under Chapter VII is an exception. Humanitarian intervention  is not explicitly dealt   with in the UN Charter, although the right to self­ determination is explicit in Article 1(2).         Mostly arguments were based on Article 2(4) of the UN Charter, saying that humanitarian intervention   was part of the self­defense of the country concerned , and that either explicit approval had  been received from the authorities, or silent acquiescence.       In that sense there was no violation of Article 2(4), as humanitarian intervention was not action against the  "territorial integrity or political independence of any state". Article 51 is also commonly used as part of an argument for humanitarian intervention, stating that  intervention is action taking in self­defense on behalf of the people. It is evident that the arguments were  highly questionable, and that interventions may have been and are carried out of pure political self­interest.  Chapter VII     →  allows the Security Council  to take any measures necessary to ­ “ restore international peace  and security". The only situation in which the use of force will be taken on a early lawful basis , is in connection  with a Security Council decision under Chapter VII.  In all other situations  the legal basis for use of force can be debated.  Under Chapter VII of the UN Charter, the Security Council may take action with respect to  threats  to the peace, breaches of the peace, and acts of aggression.   Article 24(1) gives the Security Council the  primary responsibility for the maintenance of  international peace and security .  Humanitarian access should not be confused with humanitarian intervention.  The term humanitarian intervention has been used in operations where a state or several states have  intervened in the  territory of another state because of                violations of human rights, to set free hostages, or for the purpose                 of delivering humanitarian aid.    Consensus Dilemma      UN legal provisions allow the Security Council to authorise action only if a consensus can be reached  that a umanitarian disaster is a threat to international peace and security .   Debates with respect to definitions, criteria,  decisionmaking process, implementation New perception/momentum   the Post­Cold War environment is more conducive to successful interventions.                              Important distinction : humanitarian intervention discussed as a right, not a duty.     States meant that if they felt compelled to intervene with humanitarian action, they d a right to  do  so, but they did not have a duty  to do so in case they were not interested: Northern Iraq, Somalia,  Rwanda, Kosovo.   Humanitarian interventi
More Less

Related notes for POL2103

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit