Class Notes (839,113)
Canada (511,191)
POL2108 (80)
Lecture

Machiavelli Discourses Lecture.docx

3 Pages
131 Views

Department
Political Science
Course Code
POL2108
Professor
James Brooke- Smith

This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full 3 pages of the document.
Description
Not dedicated to a ruler, but to two republican friends => more frank, can derive people  in power as incompetent. What makes for civic greatness? => Liberty How is liberty to be acquired, and how is it preserved? Book I => Domestic Policies: things that happen inside the city Book II => Foreign Policy: expand, attack, and build an empire Book III => Public Council: Great leadership, private council  Preface: ­ It is very dangerous to create a new order of things => referring to himself  (comparing to Christopher Columbus page 83) he thinks he is the first one to look  at history in the proper way. ­ Contradiction when he was lamenting that the moderns did not copy the ancients  (p83). Yet, p158 critiques the moderns to be fond of the ancients. ­ He wants moderns to be inspired by the ancients, but to conserve a critical eye.  We should keep in mind the amorality of their actions, etc. ­ Sees himself as a teacher => p161 he is talking to the young, especially to the  manliest. The young can easily get exited about contesting authority and traditions —especially religious traditions—and they are not yet too syndical. BOOK I­X   I) What is the origin of political society? ­ p84+p89 => largely out of necessity (need for security). In the beginning, there  was fear. Fear created the first monarchies. Fear and necessity are good things =>  Men never do any good except when they are forced to (p93). If you make things  difficult for your people, they will be ingenious, and productive. But, you don’t  have to base yourself on physical necessity II) Artificial Necessities ­ Create good laws (artificial necessities): force citizens to be good, honest, hard  working, and efficient. ­ There is no best regime. The good ones don’t last, and the other ones are evil. ­ The ideal regime is the mixed constitution: using all good regimes. Rome had the  best regime (see notebook). Athens’ problem was that it was too democratic.  ­ Mixed regime kept socials tensions tamed, but were not eradicated => have the  poor and the rich distrust each other is the best thing for liberty because both  camps will always look what the other is doing. In the Roman structure, the  Tribunes keep people in check. The rich want to oppress, and the poor want to be  left alone (93).  ­ Chap 5 => there is 2 distinct viewpoints in every republic: that of the populous,  and that of the elite. To get liberty, you have to use this tension. ­ If you want a republic whose goal is to conquer an empire, then follow the  romans: trust the people. If you want a stable republic, imitate Venice or Sparta:  trust the elite. If we look at the history, the elite are more trustable then the  populous: Venice and Sparta were longer lived then Rome. ­ P101: it’s boring, futile and dangerous for a state to merely seek stability. In life,  nothing stands still. Because of this, things must either be rising or falling.  Stability isn’t an option (but then why did Sparta survive?). Machiavelli chooses  400 years of Roman expansion over 800 years of stability. Longevity is not the  only matter. Power and grandeur matters. => You should trust the people with  power for the construction of an empire. ­ Wise rulers we construct a mixed constitutions, but at the end of the day you trust  your people. Second of all, he will create something like the tribunes in order to  use the conflict for stability. ­ Laws that permit people to make public accusation against powerful officials are  extremel
More Less
Unlock Document

Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit