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Lecture 6

POL3126 Lecture 6: Jan 31- Pin Money

3 Pages
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Department
Political Science
Course Code
POL3126
Professor
Miriam Levitt

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January 31, 2017
Pin Money, McJobs and Glass Ceilings
Pre-Wage economy (pre-industrialization)
- The family was the sole unit of the economic production
- Work consisted of hunting, collecting and growing products for trade
- All members of the family and an integral role to play
- In addition to the labour within the family production unit, women were required to also
maintain the home and mother their children
- No separation between the public economy and private life
Industrial Revolution (mid 19th century)
- Wage economy divided the family, men became primary breadwinner
- Some women (mainly unmarried) worked in factories (textile) as well as keep boarders,
sewing, teaching, doing laundry, and working as “cleaning ladies” in other homes
Early 20th century
- Growth within technology and consumption
- Women found work within education and health care
- Women were paid significantly less than men and worked longer hours
- Working conditions were poor, factories were heavily unregulated
Pin Money
- A term used referring to a woman’s income
- A married woman’s income was views as supplementary to her husband’s
- Women who did earn the primary income for herself and her family were not recognized
World wars
- During WW1, women demonstrated that they were capable and willing to work for pay
- Attitudes towards working women had shifted
- However, women’s labour was still undervalued as it was seen as an extension of the
ongoing war effort
- 80,000 women returned back to work in the home after the war ended
Mid 20th century (60-70s)
- economic boom within industrial economy, need for more employees
- significant increase in number of women employed in paid positions
- married women worked out of need, however many worked as a supplementary income
to by new modern convinces
- Women became heavily involved in unions
- During the 80s there was a pushback against issues addressed in the 70s
Nature of women’s work
- “double shift work” where women had to maintain both public and private work
- many women were employed in part time positions due to the expectation of balancing
their work inside and outside the home
- burden renders negative impacts on women’s health, political engagement, and the
economics of the state
- women have less time to participate in activities within the public sphere especially
politics
- domestic work is not viewed as productive, yet is crucial to support public productive
work
The family wage
- the 19th and 20th century families were not making a living wage
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find more resources at oneclass.com January 31, 2017 Pin Money, McJobs and Glass Ceilings Pre-Wage economy (pre-industrialization) - The family was the sole unit of the economic production - Work consisted of hunting, collecting and growing products for trade - All members of the family and an integral role to play - In addition to the labour within the family production unit, women were required to also maintain the home and mother their children - No separation between the public economy and private life Industrial Revolution (mid 19 century) - Wage economy divided the family, men became primary breadwinner - Some women (mainly unmarried) worked in factories (textile) as well as keep boarders, sewing, teaching, doing laundry, and working as “cleaning ladies” in other homes Early 20 century - Growth within technology and consumption - Women found work within education and health care - Women were paid significantly less than men and worked longer hours - Working conditions were poor, factories were heavily unregulated Pin Money - A term used referring to a woman’s income - A married woman’s income was views as supplementary to her husband’s - Women who did earn the primary income for herself and her family were not recognized World wars - During WW1, women demonstrated that they were capable and willing to work for pay - Attitudes towards working women had shifted - However, women’s labour was still undervalued as it was seen as an extension of the ongoing war effort - 80,000 women returned back to work in the home after the war ended th Mid 20 century (60-70s) - economic boom within industrial economy, need for more employees - significant increase in number of women employed in paid positions - married women worked out of need, however many worked as a supplementary income to by new modern convinces - Women became heavily involved in unions - During the 80s there was a pushback against issues addressed in the 70s Nature of women’s work - “double shift work” where women had to maintain both public and private work - many women were employed in part time positions due to the expectation of balancing their work inside and outside the home - burden renders negative impacts on women’s health, political engagement, and the economics of the state - women have less time to participate in activities within the public sphere especially politics - domestic work is not viewed as productive, yet is crucial to support public productive work The family wage th th - the 19 and 20 century families were not making a living wage find more resources at oneclass.com find more resources at oneclass.com January 31, 2017 - Large working class population - A woman’s income still seen as supplementary, even though most families were quite poor - Demanding equal pay developed into a movement for the family wage
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