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Lecture

Theatre History Feb.11.docx

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Department
Theatre
Course
THE2131
Professor
Dr.Joel Benabu
Semester
Winter

Description
Feb.11 2014 Hippolytus Question/ interrogative tragedy. Challenges the audience perspective on certain subject matter ( Gender, Nationality, Social.) Different motivations between humans and Gods. Hippolytus and Humans try to do the right things (harsh human behaviour.) Gods wants revenge and are negative aspect. Circumstances are fundamental especially in tragedy. Frogs p.136 and onwards Mentions how Euripides writes and questions audience’s perspective. Old Comedy: Added to festival after Athenian democracy (486 BC) Dioniosa and 442 BC Lynia. Old Comedy dealt with political and social questions of the day in a humorous sand critical way. Comedy became more prominent during the Petoponesian war between Athens and Spartans between 431-404 BC. Lysistrata (women have sex war, not having sex until system reforms attitude towards women.) Loosely based plot, hero confronting problem, larger than life plan (fantastical.) Hero goes nd through plan. 2 part of play. Scenes included sex and bathroom jokes, political stabs including institutions (not tightly connected to story) Parts of Old Comedy 1. Parabasis: scene which entire chorus or chorus leader or playwright himself speaks as theatre practitioner directly to audience satyring political figures or institutions. If chorus they take off costumes, stop action of play, walk to edge of stage( the lip) and speak directly to “ Joke person,” if present at performance. 2. Agon: Conflict between two characters, physical confrontation. Example: Frogs is a debate between Euripides and Aeschylus. 3. Chorus much large, 24 members, usually split into two groups of 12. Unison enters through paradoi singing and dancing. Usually related to nature (frogs, birds.) Sole survivor Aristophanes: middle class, took a role in politica
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