CCT316 - November 5th, 2012.doc

4 Pages
132 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Communication, Culture and Technology
Course
CCT316H5
Professor
Neil Narine
Semester
Fall

Description
High Advertising – depict unreal scenes, abstract scenes to create this feeling. Mystical and outside the realm of everyday experience Ex – Hermes, Chanel Middle Advertising – they simply exploit the contradiction between middle and high culture capital • offers us (middle class) the promise of distinction in higher tastes • BUT it tells everyone that they can be higher Smirnoff Ad – signifies high class (In a black dress, martini) and middleclass (Tatttoo on her arm) to suggest the higher cult. Middle advertising promises that WE WILL stand out but also be popular and accepted Low Advertising – targets the “working classes” who need to be convinced to feel about their lives • Alcohol and tobacco ads are most common in working class areas – these products are thought to “pacify” to speak • These ads rarely have aspirational themes • More so about “good times” “Budweiser” on the lake ad Bud Bowl ad of 1989 Youth Markets Define YOUTH Invention of the Teenager 1950s youth culture out of control youth creative innovative youth Children/Childhoods in Ads: 3 Key Elements • Childhood Innocence • Christmas Holidays • Coca-Colas as a “treat” • Coke ads configured the semiotics modern Santa Claus” Childhood however is not the same as YOUTH • “youth” in ads can mean different things • to be youthful in your middle age: buy a sports car • to be youthful: innovate, create, rebel against the rules Defining Youth: At the heart of the way youth are understood in popular culture, is a contradiction. Youth are both a market and complex and highly differentiated range of cultural practices • Young people are at the center of consumer culture, and yet, in the way young people consume, use and CREATE popular culture, they are also the HARBRINGERS of CHANGE. The Invention of the TEENAGER • was invented in 1944 • Teenagers had their own rituals, rights and demands • Teens embodied post-war enthusiasm • Sought new forms of INDIVIDUATION & REBELLION • Teenagers were seen
More Less

Related notes for CCT316H5

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit