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Lecture 12

ENG250Y5 Lecture Notes - Lecture 12: Moral Character, Equal Voice, Double Standard


Department
English
Course Code
ENG250Y5
Professor
Melissa Gniadek
Lecture
12

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Lecture 12: The Coquette cont.
Monday, October 26, 2015
1:04 PM
First letter: contrast between morality, social standards, and freedom, pleasure
set out right from the beginning of the novel
Number of early American novels that have similar seduction thoughts
Character traits:
Eliza Major Sanford Mr. Boyer (Clergyman)
Curious
Naïve
Stubborn
Honest
Ambitious
Care-free
Ambivalent
Selfish
Relentless
Jealous
Manipulative
Stubborn
Vengeful
Sexual
Deceitful
Arrogant
Moral
principled
Hyper-
critical
Dominant
Virtue
Passive
Jealous
Preachy
Honest
Writes to Lucy
Freeman/Sumner
Mother Mrs. W
Boyer
Writes to Charles Deighton Writes to Selby
Fairly clear what each character represents
Boyer: social order, cares what people think
Sanford: deceitful, manipulative, ambitious, exciting in contrast to Boyer
oRepresents an individual self-interest
Eliza is more in line with Sanford
Boyer has more internal tensions
Not presented as cleanly perfect, self-interested in the midst of all his virtues
Form: epistolary
Inner self: hidden thoughts, desires
One scene reported from multiple points of view
Hidden thoughts and desires of various characters
Intimate relations and exchanges between letters, yet still have to maintain
societal norms
Gives equal voice to men and women
Negotiation
Dramatic irony: characters have different stories about the same thing/idea
Highlights a gap between inner self and exterior
A "rake": man habituated to womanizing, gambling, etc. vs. Coquette: flirt
Relationship between these two terms/concepts seems important
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