ERS111H5S Lecture Notes - Lecture 3: Georef, Scopus, Scientific Journal

68 views9 pages
20 Oct 2018
School
Department
Course
Professor
ERS111: Earth, Climate & Life
Information Literacy Session
Fall 2018
Jessica Hanley, BSc., MLIS - Science Liaison Librarian
Learning Objectives
Learn to navigate the library website
How to develop a search strategy using Boolean logic
How to access a primary, peer-reviewed academic article
How to evaluate resources
What is a Librarian?
Who we are what what we do… Here to Help!
The Library Website
Research Guide
Assignment
You will need to find scholarly articles for your assignment! These articles must
be:
From a Scientific Journal
Primary
Peer-Reviewed
What is a Scientific Journal?
A scientific journal article is an article published in a journal that is written
by scientists for a scholarly audience.
…And where do I find these articles?
Scientific journal articles can be found in multiple places but we are going to
focus on those that are indexed in databases.
Today:
Web of Science
SCOPUS
GeoRef
GeoBase
What is a database?
A database is a collection of data that has been systematically organized
Go beyond Google for academic research
Why use a database?
Library Databases
Paid for by the library so you have free access to scholarly information.
Content is evaluated for authority and accuracy.
Information is stable.
There are databases relating specifically to your topic/subject area
Library databases offer options to quickly limit or expand your search to
find the articles you need.
The Internet
Some resources are free, but others require you to pay for them.
Information is not evaluated for accuracy and may be incorrect, misleading or
biased.
Websites come and go.
The internet is a vast sea of information with no organization.
A search engine (like Google) often returns an overwhelming number of results
with no quick way to narrow them down or ensure they relate to your topic.
Starting your search
Remember that searching:
is an ITERATIVE process
often requires re-evaluation and testing, from adding or changing
keywords and the ways they relate to each other, to choosing new
resources to search, and even rewording or straight-up changing the
research question!
is a logic puzzle that requires an understanding of precision and sensitivity
pretty fun once you get the hang of the process!
6 Major Steps
Create a well-defined question
Brainstorm for and gather synonyms
Construct a search strategy
Select database(s)
Tailor search strategy to databases
Save search and export results to reference manager
Where to begin?
Ask yourself three questions:
What is my topic?
What are the key aspects of this topic?
What are alternate keywords for each aspect?
Keywords
Keywords are the main ideas contained in your research question or topic.
This can be the hardest part of the search!
Brainstorm keywords to use in your search. Pick words that represent each key
aspect of your topic.
The same idea can be expressed in many ways. To ensure best results when
searching, brainstorm several keywords!
Which keywords best represent the main concepts in the following topic:
Are greenhouse gases from human activities the most significant driver of
observed climate change?
Greenhouse gases, activities, weather
Greenhouse gases, climate
human activities, climate
Greenhouse gases, humans, climate change
Next Steps…
Synonyms are the key to finding articles – Thesaurus.com
Boolean logic is the key to using synonyms
Build Your Search
Boolean logic is the fancy way you search research databases use to search. It's
required in research databases and will make your Google searching stronger.
Boolean operators connect your keywords together.
Basic Boolean operators are:
AND, and OR.
You also use "quotation marks.” and Truncation*
AND
AND links together new aspects of your topic. It tells the database that all the
search terms must be present in the results.
For example: (cloning AND ethics AND humans) would bring in results like the
diagram
OR
OR links synonyms or similar ideas. Using OR will bring in more search results as
results containing any combination of one or more of these words will be found
For example: you might be interested in ("global warming" OR "climate
change").
”Quotation Marks”
Use quotation marks when you want to tell the database to search a phrase.
For example: (weather OR “climate change”)
Truncation - *
Truncation is a technique that broadens your search to include various word
endings and spellings. To use truncation, enter the root of a word and add the
truncation symbol at the end.
For example: Evol*
Includes:
Evolve
Evolves
Evolved
Evolution
Evolutionary
Which search strategy would be the best fit?
Can endangered animals be saved by helping local people develop alternative
economies like ecotourism?
endangered animals AND local people AND ecotourism
(“endangered animal*” OR “endangered species”) AND local AND
(people* OR human*) AND (ecotour* OR “alternative econom*)
endangered animal* OR endangered species AND local AND people AND
ecotour*
Primary vs Secondary Resources
2 key types of scientific journal articles:
Primary: empirical, original research, direct observation
Review paper: literature review
Based on topic or research question
Examines existing literature
Primary Sources
Tips for Identifying Primary Resources
The author(s) conducted the research
Materials and Methods section describes what they did
Results section highlights what they found
Peer Review
Peer review is the process by which scholars critically appraise each other's
work. It is intended to ensure a high level of scholarship in a journal and to
improve the quality and readability of a manuscript. Peer reviewed and refereed
are the same.
How it works:
When the manuscript of an article is submitted to a peer-reviewed
journal, independent experts are asked to read and comment on the
manuscript. If approved by the reviewers, the manuscript is accepted for
publication as an article in the journal.
Peer Review Process
How do we know something is
Peer-Reviewed?
Set database to filter for peer review
OR
Search the name of the journal (NOT the name of the article) in Ulrichs -
https://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/
Databases
Earth Science focused:
GEOBASE - a multidisciplinary database containing research in various
fields of earth sciences
GeoRef - comprehensive geoscience database that contains over 2.9
million references to geoscience journal articles, books, maps, conference
papers, reports and theses.
Databases
Interdisciplinary:
Scopus - a large abstract and index database of peer-reviewed sources
with quality resources across the fields of science, technology, medicine
and social sciences.
Web of Science - a database repository, housing numerous collections and
providing access to scholarly resources across disciplines including:
sciences, social sciences, arts, medicine and humanities.
How to Evaluate Sources: The CRAAP Test!
When deciding which articles to use to support the ideas and arguments in your
paper, ask yourself: is it good, or is it craap?!
Currency
The timeliness (publication date) of the information. Is the information up
to date?
Broken links or an old publication date indicates the page has not been
updated recently.
Relevance
The importance of the information for your needs.
Consider your audience and compare with a variety of sources.
Authority
The source (author, publisher, sponsor) of the information.
Check for contact information and the credentials of the author.
Accuracy
The reliability (source, evidence, truthfulness) of the information.
Think about the source and look for evidence of objectivity, bias or error.
Purpose
The reason (teach, sell, entertain) the information exists.
Identify the type of information (fact or opinion) and the intent of the
author.
References
Provide the complete reference of your article in APA Format
Example: Author(s). (Year). Title of Article.Title of Periodical, Volume Number
(issue number), pages.
Harlow, H. F. (1983). Fundamentals for preparing psychology journal
articles. Journal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology, 55(3), 893-896.
Multiple Authors
All authors should be included in reference lists unless there are more than five,
in which case only the first author should be given, followed by ‘et al.’
For further examples: Purdue APA Style Guide
APA In-Text
Include an in-text citation when you refer to, summarize, paraphrase, or quote
from another source. For every in-text citation in your paper, there must be a
corresponding entry in your reference list.
Example:
A few researchers in the linguistics field have developed training
programs designed to improve native speakers' ability to understand
accented speech (Derwing, Rossiter, & Munro, 2002; Thomas, 2004).
Their training techniques are based on the research described above
indicating that comprehension improves with exposure to non-native
speech. Derwing et al. (2002) conducted their training with students
preparing to be social workers, but note that other professionals who
work with non-native speakers could benefit from a similar program.
Cite Website in APA
With Author:
Bibliography:
Author, A. (date). Title of document [Format description]. Retrieved
from http://URL
§
Cite in text:
In text: (Author, year)
§
No Author:
Bibliography:
All 33 Chile miners freed in flawless rescue. (2010, October 13).
Retrieved from
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/39625809/ns/world_news-
americas/
§
Cite in text:
the first few words of the reference list entry (usually the title) and
the year. ("All 33 Chile Miners," 2010).
§
Getting Help
Drop by the Library’s reference desk, located by the entrance
Online Chat
Email
Jessica.Hanley@utoronto.ca
Week 3: Tuesday -library presentation
Tuesday, September 18, 2018
8:59 AM
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 9 pages and 3 million more documents.

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ERS111: Earth, Climate & Life
Information Literacy Session
Fall 2018
Jessica Hanley, BSc., MLIS - Science Liaison Librarian
Learning Objectives
Learn to navigate the library website
How to develop a search strategy using Boolean logic
How to access a primary, peer-reviewed academic article
How to evaluate resources
What is a Librarian?
Who we are what what we do… Here to Help!
The Library Website
Research Guide
Assignment
You will need to find scholarly articles for your assignment! These articles must
be:
From a Scientific Journal
Primary
Peer-Reviewed
What is a Scientific Journal?
A scientific journal article is an article published in a journal that is written
by scientists for a scholarly audience.
…And where do I find these articles?
Scientific journal articles can be found in multiple places but we are going to
focus on those that are indexed in databases.
Today:
Web of Science
SCOPUS
GeoRef
GeoBase
What is a database?
A database is a collection of data that has been systematically organized
Go beyond Google for academic research
Why use a database?
Library Databases
Paid for by the library so you have free access to scholarly information.
Content is evaluated for authority and accuracy.
Information is stable.
There are databases relating specifically to your topic/subject area
Library databases offer options to quickly limit or expand your search to
find the articles you need.
The Internet
Some resources are free, but others require you to pay for them.
Information is not evaluated for accuracy and may be incorrect, misleading or
biased.
Websites come and go.
The internet is a vast sea of information with no organization.
A search engine (like Google) often returns an overwhelming number of results
with no quick way to narrow them down or ensure they relate to your topic.
Starting your search
Remember that searching:
is an ITERATIVE process
often requires re-evaluation and testing, from adding or changing
keywords and the ways they relate to each other, to choosing new
resources to search, and even rewording or straight-up changing the
research question!
is a logic puzzle that requires an understanding of precision and sensitivity
pretty fun once you get the hang of the process!
6 Major Steps
Create a well-defined question
Brainstorm for and gather synonyms
Construct a search strategy
Select database(s)
Tailor search strategy to databases
Save search and export results to reference manager
Where to begin?
Ask yourself three questions:
What is my topic?
What are the key aspects of this topic?
What are alternate keywords for each aspect?
Keywords
Keywords are the main ideas contained in your research question or topic.
This can be the hardest part of the search!
Brainstorm keywords to use in your search. Pick words that represent each key
aspect of your topic.
The same idea can be expressed in many ways. To ensure best results when
searching, brainstorm several keywords!
Which keywords best represent the main concepts in the following topic:
Are greenhouse gases from human activities the most significant driver of
observed climate change?
Greenhouse gases, activities, weather
Greenhouse gases, climate
human activities, climate
Greenhouse gases, humans, climate change
Next Steps…
Synonyms are the key to finding articles – Thesaurus.com
Boolean logic is the key to using synonyms
Build Your Search
Boolean logic is the fancy way you search research databases use to search. It's
required in research databases and will make your Google searching stronger.
Boolean operators connect your keywords together.
Basic Boolean operators are:
AND, and OR.
You also use "quotation marks.” and Truncation*
AND
AND links together new aspects of your topic. It tells the database that all the
search terms must be present in the results.
For example: (cloning AND ethics AND humans) would bring in results like the
diagram
OR
OR links synonyms or similar ideas. Using OR will bring in more search results as
results containing any combination of one or more of these words will be found
For example: you might be interested in ("global warming" OR "climate
change").
”Quotation Marks”
Use quotation marks when you want to tell the database to search a phrase.
For example: (weather OR “climate change”)
Truncation - *
Truncation is a technique that broadens your search to include various word
endings and spellings. To use truncation, enter the root of a word and add the
truncation symbol at the end.
For example: Evol*
Includes:
Evolve
Evolves
Evolved
Evolution
Evolutionary
Which search strategy would be the best fit?
Can endangered animals be saved by helping local people develop alternative
economies like ecotourism?
endangered animals AND local people AND ecotourism
(“endangered animal*” OR “endangered species”) AND local AND
(people* OR human*) AND (ecotour* OR “alternative econom*)
endangered animal* OR endangered species AND local AND people AND
ecotour*
Primary vs Secondary Resources
2 key types of scientific journal articles:
Primary: empirical, original research, direct observation
Review paper: literature review
Based on topic or research question
Examines existing literature
Primary Sources
Tips for Identifying Primary Resources
The author(s) conducted the research
Materials and Methods section describes what they did
Results section highlights what they found
Peer Review
Peer review is the process by which scholars critically appraise each other's
work. It is intended to ensure a high level of scholarship in a journal and to
improve the quality and readability of a manuscript. Peer reviewed and refereed
are the same.
How it works:
When the manuscript of an article is submitted to a peer-reviewed
journal, independent experts are asked to read and comment on the
manuscript. If approved by the reviewers, the manuscript is accepted for
publication as an article in the journal.
Peer Review Process
How do we know something is
Peer-Reviewed?
Set database to filter for peer review
OR
Search the name of the journal (NOT the name of the article) in Ulrichs -
https://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/
Databases
Earth Science focused:
GEOBASE - a multidisciplinary database containing research in various
fields of earth sciences
GeoRef - comprehensive geoscience database that contains over 2.9
million references to geoscience journal articles, books, maps, conference
papers, reports and theses.
Databases
Interdisciplinary:
Scopus - a large abstract and index database of peer-reviewed sources
with quality resources across the fields of science, technology, medicine
and social sciences.
Web of Science - a database repository, housing numerous collections and
providing access to scholarly resources across disciplines including:
sciences, social sciences, arts, medicine and humanities.
How to Evaluate Sources: The CRAAP Test!
When deciding which articles to use to support the ideas and arguments in your
paper, ask yourself: is it good, or is it craap?!
Currency
The timeliness (publication date) of the information. Is the information up
to date?
Broken links or an old publication date indicates the page has not been
updated recently.
Relevance
The importance of the information for your needs.
Consider your audience and compare with a variety of sources.
Authority
The source (author, publisher, sponsor) of the information.
Check for contact information and the credentials of the author.
Accuracy
The reliability (source, evidence, truthfulness) of the information.
Think about the source and look for evidence of objectivity, bias or error.
Purpose
The reason (teach, sell, entertain) the information exists.
Identify the type of information (fact or opinion) and the intent of the
author.
References
Provide the complete reference of your article in APA Format
Example: Author(s). (Year). Title of Article.Title of Periodical, Volume Number
(issue number), pages.
Harlow, H. F. (1983). Fundamentals for preparing psychology journal
articles. Journal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology, 55(3), 893-896.
Multiple Authors
All authors should be included in reference lists unless there are more than five,
in which case only the first author should be given, followed by ‘et al.’
For further examples: Purdue APA Style Guide
APA In-Text
Include an in-text citation when you refer to, summarize, paraphrase, or quote
from another source. For every in-text citation in your paper, there must be a
corresponding entry in your reference list.
Example:
A few researchers in the linguistics field have developed training
programs designed to improve native speakers' ability to understand
accented speech (Derwing, Rossiter, & Munro, 2002; Thomas, 2004).
Their training techniques are based on the research described above
indicating that comprehension improves with exposure to non-native
speech. Derwing et al. (2002) conducted their training with students
preparing to be social workers, but note that other professionals who
work with non-native speakers could benefit from a similar program.
Cite Website in APA
With Author:
Bibliography:
Author, A. (date). Title of document [Format description]. Retrieved
from http://URL
§
Cite in text:
In text: (Author, year)
§
No Author:
Bibliography:
All 33 Chile miners freed in flawless rescue. (2010, October 13).
Retrieved from
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/39625809/ns/world_news-
americas/
§
Cite in text:
the first few words of the reference list entry (usually the title) and
the year. ("All 33 Chile Miners," 2010).
§
Getting Help
Drop by the Library’s reference desk, located by the entrance
Online Chat
Email
Jessica.Hanley@utoronto.ca
Week 3: Tuesday -library presentation
Tuesday, September 18, 2018 8:59 AM
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 9 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
ERS111: Earth, Climate & Life
Information Literacy Session
Fall 2018
Jessica Hanley, BSc., MLIS - Science Liaison Librarian
Learning Objectives
Learn to navigate the library website
How to develop a search strategy using Boolean logic
How to access a primary, peer-reviewed academic article
How to evaluate resources
What is a Librarian?
Who we are what what we do… Here to Help!
The Library Website
Research Guide
Assignment
You will need to find scholarly articles for your assignment! These articles must
be:
From a Scientific Journal
Primary
Peer-Reviewed
What is a Scientific Journal?
A scientific journal article is an article published in a journal that is written
by scientists for a scholarly audience.
…And where do I find these articles?
Scientific journal articles can be found in multiple places but we are going to
focus on those that are indexed in databases.
Today:
Web of Science
SCOPUS
GeoRef
GeoBase
What is a database?
A database is a collection of data that has been systematically organized
Go beyond Google for academic research
Why use a database?
Library Databases
Paid for by the library so you have free access to scholarly information.
Content is evaluated for authority and accuracy.
Information is stable.
There are databases relating specifically to your topic/subject area
Library databases offer options to quickly limit or expand your search to
find the articles you need.
The Internet
Some resources are free, but others require you to pay for them.
Information is not evaluated for accuracy and may be incorrect, misleading or
biased.
Websites come and go.
The internet is a vast sea of information with no organization.
A search engine (like Google) often returns an overwhelming number of results
with no quick way to narrow them down or ensure they relate to your topic.
Starting your search
Remember that searching:
is an ITERATIVE process
often requires re-evaluation and testing, from adding or changing
keywords and the ways they relate to each other, to choosing new
resources to search, and even rewording or straight-up changing the
research question!
is a logic puzzle that requires an understanding of precision and sensitivity
pretty fun once you get the hang of the process!
6 Major Steps
Create a well-defined question
Brainstorm for and gather synonyms
Construct a search strategy
Select database(s)
Tailor search strategy to databases
Save search and export results to reference manager
Where to begin?
Ask yourself three questions:
What is my topic?
What are the key aspects of this topic?
What are alternate keywords for each aspect?
Keywords
Keywords are the main ideas contained in your research question or topic.
This can be the hardest part of the search!
Brainstorm keywords to use in your search. Pick words that represent each key
aspect of your topic.
The same idea can be expressed in many ways. To ensure best results when
searching, brainstorm several keywords!
Which keywords best represent the main concepts in the following topic:
Are greenhouse gases from human activities the most significant driver of
observed climate change?
Greenhouse gases, activities, weather
Greenhouse gases, climate
human activities, climate
Greenhouse gases, humans, climate change
Next Steps…
Synonyms are the key to finding articles – Thesaurus.com
Boolean logic is the key to using synonyms
Build Your Search
Boolean logic is the fancy way you search research databases use to search. It's
required in research databases and will make your Google searching stronger.
Boolean operators connect your keywords together.
Basic Boolean operators are:
AND, and OR.
You also use "quotation marks.” and Truncation*
AND
AND links together new aspects of your topic. It tells the database that all the
search terms must be present in the results.
For example: (cloning AND ethics AND humans) would bring in results like the
diagram
OR
OR links synonyms or similar ideas. Using OR will bring in more search results as
results containing any combination of one or more of these words will be found
For example: you might be interested in ("global warming" OR "climate
change").
”Quotation Marks”
Use quotation marks when you want to tell the database to search a phrase.
For example: (weather OR “climate change”)
Truncation - *
Truncation is a technique that broadens your search to include various word
endings and spellings. To use truncation, enter the root of a word and add the
truncation symbol at the end.
For example: Evol*
Includes:
Evolve
Evolves
Evolved
Evolution
Evolutionary
Which search strategy would be the best fit?
Can endangered animals be saved by helping local people develop alternative
economies like ecotourism?
endangered animals AND local people AND ecotourism
(“endangered animal*” OR “endangered species”) AND local AND
(people* OR human*) AND (ecotour* OR “alternative econom*)
endangered animal* OR endangered species AND local AND people AND
ecotour*
Primary vs Secondary Resources
2 key types of scientific journal articles:
Primary: empirical, original research, direct observation
Review paper: literature review
Based on topic or research question
Examines existing literature
Primary Sources
Tips for Identifying Primary Resources
The author(s) conducted the research
Materials and Methods section describes what they did
Results section highlights what they found
Peer Review
Peer review is the process by which scholars critically appraise each other's
work. It is intended to ensure a high level of scholarship in a journal and to
improve the quality and readability of a manuscript. Peer reviewed and refereed
are the same.
How it works:
When the manuscript of an article is submitted to a peer-reviewed
journal, independent experts are asked to read and comment on the
manuscript. If approved by the reviewers, the manuscript is accepted for
publication as an article in the journal.
Peer Review Process
How do we know something is
Peer-Reviewed?
Set database to filter for peer review
OR
Search the name of the journal (NOT the name of the article) in Ulrichs -
https://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/
Databases
Earth Science focused:
GEOBASE - a multidisciplinary database containing research in various
fields of earth sciences
GeoRef - comprehensive geoscience database that contains over 2.9
million references to geoscience journal articles, books, maps, conference
papers, reports and theses.
Databases
Interdisciplinary:
Scopus - a large abstract and index database of peer-reviewed sources
with quality resources across the fields of science, technology, medicine
and social sciences.
Web of Science - a database repository, housing numerous collections and
providing access to scholarly resources across disciplines including:
sciences, social sciences, arts, medicine and humanities.
How to Evaluate Sources: The CRAAP Test!
When deciding which articles to use to support the ideas and arguments in your
paper, ask yourself: is it good, or is it craap?!
Currency
The timeliness (publication date) of the information. Is the information up
to date?
Broken links or an old publication date indicates the page has not been
updated recently.
Relevance
The importance of the information for your needs.
Consider your audience and compare with a variety of sources.
Authority
The source (author, publisher, sponsor) of the information.
Check for contact information and the credentials of the author.
Accuracy
The reliability (source, evidence, truthfulness) of the information.
Think about the source and look for evidence of objectivity, bias or error.
Purpose
The reason (teach, sell, entertain) the information exists.
Identify the type of information (fact or opinion) and the intent of the
author.
References
Provide the complete reference of your article in APA Format
Example: Author(s). (Year). Title of Article.Title of Periodical, Volume Number
(issue number), pages.
Harlow, H. F. (1983). Fundamentals for preparing psychology journal
articles. Journal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology, 55(3), 893-896.
Multiple Authors
All authors should be included in reference lists unless there are more than five,
in which case only the first author should be given, followed by ‘et al.’
For further examples: Purdue APA Style Guide
APA In-Text
Include an in-text citation when you refer to, summarize, paraphrase, or quote
from another source. For every in-text citation in your paper, there must be a
corresponding entry in your reference list.
Example:
A few researchers in the linguistics field have developed training
programs designed to improve native speakers' ability to understand
accented speech (Derwing, Rossiter, & Munro, 2002; Thomas, 2004).
Their training techniques are based on the research described above
indicating that comprehension improves with exposure to non-native
speech. Derwing et al. (2002) conducted their training with students
preparing to be social workers, but note that other professionals who
work with non-native speakers could benefit from a similar program.
Cite Website in APA
With Author:
Bibliography:
Author, A. (date). Title of document [Format description]. Retrieved
from http://URL
§
Cite in text:
In text: (Author, year)
§
No Author:
Bibliography:
All 33 Chile miners freed in flawless rescue. (2010, October 13).
Retrieved from
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/39625809/ns/world_news-
americas/
§
Cite in text:
the first few words of the reference list entry (usually the title) and
the year. ("All 33 Chile Miners," 2010).
§
Getting Help
Drop by the Library’s reference desk, located by the entrance
Online Chat
Email
Jessica.Hanley@utoronto.ca
Week 3: Tuesday -library presentation
Tuesday, September 18, 2018 8:59 AM
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 9 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in

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