Class Notes (837,848)
Canada (510,512)
Philosophy (540)
PHL145H5 (81)
Lecture 11

Lecture 11 - Moral Reasoning.docx

7 Pages
126 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHL145H5
Professor
Nate Charlow
Semester
Fall

Description
Moral Reasoning 19-24 November 2013 Moral argumentation stems from moral disagreement. Moral disagreement (say about if it was  right for US to drop 2 atomic bombs on japan) usually has 2 sorts of sources: • Disagreement of fact: did dropping 2 atomic bombs on japan reduce overall number of  war deaths? • Disagreement of moral principles: is it ever morally permissible to bomb civilian  populations during wartime? (moral principles mention words such as “forbidden”,  “wrong”, “right”,etc) Other sources of moral disagreement:  • Moral principles that we more or less all share come into conflict w/ one another. (much  political disagreement traces to conflict of political principles involving value of liberty  and others involving value of equality) • Moral principles can have different scopes (while most everyone agrees it is wrong to kill  an innocent human being, there is disagreement about whether this extends to various  kinds of criminals, fetuses, or non­human animals) Problem of Abortion Basic argument against abortion has 3 parts : • Moral principle : it is morally wrong to kill a person • Definitional claim : abortion is killing of a human fetus • Factual linking claim : human fetus is a person Presented carefully, it is:  1. Abortion is killing of a human fetus (definition) 2. A human fetus is a person (claim) 3. So, abortion is killing of a person (intermediate conclusion) 4. It is always morally wrong to kill a person (moral principle) 5. So abortion is morally wrong (final conclusion) Argument has 2 challengeable points: (2) and (4) Always morally wrong: against (4) Most of us do not accept that “it is always morally wrong to kill a person” • Killing a person may be justified if they are very bad • Killing a person may be justified if they are threatening someone’s life Moral Reasoning 19-24 November 2013 This is general and difficult, fact about moral principles: it is difficult to formulate any moral  principle that is without any exceptions. Accommodating these two exception yields:  • It is always morally wrong to kill an innocent person who is not threatening someone’s  life (false) Basic argument – reformulated 1. Abortion is killing of human fetus (definition) 2. Human fetus is a person (claim) 3. Human fetus is innocent (claim) 4. So abortion is killing of an innocent person (intermediate conclusion) 5. It is always morally wrong to kill an innocent person who is not threatening someone’s  life (modified moral principle) 6. So abortion is morally wrong, except to save someone’s life (final conclusion) This reformulated argument is challengeable at 2 points: (2) and (5) • Getting here was not trivial   Overview: Thomson (challenges 5) considers how one might support claim that a human fetus is a person  and suggests following argument:  1. No non­arbitrary point at which a human fetus becomes a person (claim) 2. If there is no non­arbitrary point at which X becomes Y, X is Y (claim) 3. So human fetus is a person (I,ii) BUT Thomson notes that (2) is false: “Similar things might be said about development of an  acorn into an oak tree, and it does not follow that acorns are oak trees” • So argument for thinking human fetuses are people fails  ▯therefore she rejects one of the  premise (5)  ▯“it is morally wrong to kill an innocent person who is not threatening  someone’s life”  ▯since (5) is false Re­Modified Moral Principle, take 1 Responsibility : when A’s right to life conflicts w/ B’s right to autonomy and B could have  reasonably foreseen possibility of this conflict, it is wrong to kill A To assess whether this sort of principle is plausible, we need to consider things like the  following:  (+): this avoids requiring you to stay hooked up to violinist Moral Reasoning 19-24 November 2013 (+): it also makes room for exceptions in the case of pregnancy resulting from rape (+): it also predicts that doing an action that you have reason to expect would lead to such  conflict changes what your duties to other person (­): cases where life of woman is at risk (­): cases of pregnancy where all reasonable precautions against pregnancy were taken Re­modified Moral Principle, Take 2 Justice: when killing A would be unjust or unfair to A, it is wrong kill A (+): Avoids requiring you to stay hooked up to violinist (since you do not act unjustly in  separating yourself from violinist) (+): conversely, it explains why we think inviting violinist to hook herself up to you and then  changing your mind is an enexcusable violating of violinist’s rights (b/c it’s unfair to violinist) (+): similarly for rape and cases of risk to woman, perhaps. It is not unjust to fetus to kill it if  woman is not responsible for its existence, or if the woman’s life is threatened by fetus (+): just seems obviously true. Unjust killing is by definition, wrong (­): question begging ­ why is killing a fetus unjust? “it is not as if there were unborn persons  drifting about world, to whom a woman who wants a child says “I invite you in”” Re­modified Moral Principle, Take 3 Justice: when A has right to use B’s body, it is wrong for B not to let A use B’s body Do fetuses have a right to use another person’s body? Here is an argument that they do: 1. If B voluntarily did an action that resulted in A’s dependence on B’s body, A has right to  use B’s body 2. If pregnancy resulted from a voluntary action, the pregnant woman did an action that  resulted in her fetus’ dependence on her body 3. So, if a pregnancy resulted from voluntary action, the fetus has right to use pregnant  woman’s body The Pro Choice Case Thomson objects to moral principle used in argument for Justice principle :  Voluntary Action Creates Responsibility: If B voluntarily did an action that resulted in A’s  dependence on B’s body, A has right to use B’s body  ▯can be proved wrong if do voluntary  action without knowing what the outcome might be (e.g. voluntarily opening up window without  knowing that a burglar will climb in) Modify principle in response to this case :  Moral Reasoning 19-24 November 2013 Voluntary Action Creates Responsibility (ii): If B voluntarily did an action B could have  reasonably foreseen might result in A’s dependence on B’s body, A has right to use B’s body  ▯ Thomson considers this false (e.g. people­seeds drift in air like pollen, and if you open your  windows, one may drift in and take root in your carpet. You don’t want children, so you fix up 
More Less

Related notes for PHL145H5

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit