Class Notes (837,848)
Canada (510,512)
POL214Y5 (144)
Lecture 4

POL214-Lecture 4.docx

5 Pages
114 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POL214Y5
Professor
Erin Tolley
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 4: Canada’s French Fact Federalism vs. Federal Government vs. Federal System vs. Confederation •  Federalis : a system of government characterized by two levels of authority  (central and regional) and a division of powers between them o Ex. Canada, Belgium, U.S •  Federal syste : basically a synonym for federalism although with more focus on  the administrative structures •  Federal government : the central (national) level of government o Only seen in countries with federalism, you could say the “central  government” but not federal •  Confederation : the process that led to the union on Canada’s colonies (which  included the adoption of federalism as the system of government)  Objectives: 1. Understand conceptions of “French Canada” 2. Understand historical roots of these visions 3. Understand how these different visions affect politics today What is French Canada? • Opposing conceptions • Territorial principle o Quebec is the center of French Canada o 85.4% of francophone in Canada live in Quebec o Most Quebeckers are francophone  Quebec as a province has a French character where most have  French as their mother tongues • Personality principle o French Canadian identity is not limited to Quebec; it exists across the  country  You can be French Canadian regardless of where you live. It’s  based on your spirit, feeling of attachment and belonging.  14.1% of Canadian Francophone live outside Quebec  17.5 % Canadians can carry on a conversation in French & English  57.8% who live outside Canada speak English as their mother  tongue, but the other quarter do speak French as their immediate  language  New Brunswick is the only province in which French and English  are both official languages (Quebec is officially French)  Implications What is the impact of these two different conceptions of French Canada? • Territorial principle o Special status for Quebec o Quebec would be “French Canada” o Rest of Canada would be “English Canada” o Raises questions about protection of French outside Quebec and English  inside Quebec • Personality principle o Quebec would be seen as a province like any other o Bilingualism would be promoted across the country Why these two different visions? • Le Grand Derangement o Acadian Expulsion, 1755­1764 o It took up much of what we now know as the Maritimes. o In 1710, Britain concurred Acadia and the English now conquered the  Acadians. A treaty however allowed for these people to keep their land. o All they had to do was swear their allegiance to Britain.  o Some Acadians o Some Acadians helped French and provide a supply line. o In 1755, Britain was interested in getting control over more of North  America. They began deporting Acadians out of Acadia, the ones who  helped the French. They were deported to French colonies in the US,  England, France and some went to settle in Louisiana. These people are  now known as Cajuns. o More than 10,000 were removed from their land and 1000 died. o In 1764, the deportation ended and some were allowed back so long as  they pledged their allegiance to the British crown o That deportation set a stage for Canadian nationalism and the recognition  for French Quebec. o This was a formative event for Acadians to develop a sense of nationalism  and some distrust of British, and a feeling of difference between  themselves and the people of Quebec  o This is the basis for personality conception. • Battle of the Plains of Abraham, 1759 o Around the time Britain was expelling the Canadians, the British were also  trying to gain power in other parts like Quebec and the United States. o It took place just outside of old Quebec City.  o Britain won the battle and as a result took a control of Quebec government  and economy.  o British tried to assassinate the French settlers, but eventually they realized  this was impossible o This set in motion many attempts to accommodate francophone o This was the basis of a territorial principle. Pre­confederation developments • Royal Proclamation, 1763 o Established British territory in North America o Stipulated that British laws would apply in Quebec o Attempt to assimilate • Quebec Act, 1774 o Guaranteed French settlers religions rights and their own system of civil 
More Less

Related notes for POL214Y5

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit