Class Notes (783,541)
Canada (480,730)
POL214Y5 (144)
Lecture 6

POL214-Lecture 6.docx

6 Pages
108 Views
Unlock Document

School
University of Toronto Mississauga
Department
Political Science
Course
POL214Y5
Professor
Erin Tolley
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 6: The Charter of Rights and Freedoms What are rights and freedoms? • Right to fair and equal treatment by the law • Conditions necessary to ensure individual freedom Positive and negative rights • Positive right o Obligate the state to provide specific goods, services, benefits and  resources o Typically oblige action o Example:   1) The right to council, if you cant afford one they can provide  you with one   2) Also the right to provision of security and police protection   3) Right to a minimum standard of living, in social cases • Negative rights o Provide protection that prevent the state from acting in certain ways or  which limit certain actions o Typically oblige inaction o Example:  1) Freedom of speech, government wont impede your freedom to  express yourself  2) Right to own property, you aren’t prevented from buying a car  or house  3) Freedom from Slavery, the government wouldn’t do something  to facilitate slavery  4) Freedom of expression, association etc.  st • When states are making a framework they adndess rde negative rights as 1   whereas the positive rights would come 2  or 3 Examples of rights and freedoms • Political liberties o Freedom of speech, assembly, religion • Legal rights o Presumption of innocence, right to trial • Equality rights o Prohibitions on discrimination • Economic rights o Right to own property o Although not enshrined in Charter Protecting citizens’ liberty British model • Parliament supremacy • Judicial interpretation but not judicial review • Courts cannot invalidate legislation American model • Courts have final authority to interpret rights and freedoms Canadian model • Hybrid • Parliamentary supremacy but with judicial review  * (Only on jurisdictional matters prior to Charter) Why did Canada need a Charter? • British North American act didn’t place a lot of limits on the supremacy of  parliament • Judicial review o Matters of provincial and federal jurisdiction o Could help protect rights and freedoms but only when case also concerned  jurisdiction • Courts could only go so far o Examples of abuses of rights and freedoms by governments o This is the same for the denial to vote for woman, also when Japanese  Canadians were in turned in WWII – its an infringement on civil liberties  that the court could not do anything about • If the matter was purely provincial or purely federal jurisdiction, the court could  not intervene even if rights and freedoms were being abused Bill of Rights • Passes by federal government in 1960 o Response to abuses of civil liberties o Inspired by universal Declaration of Human Rights “Recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all  members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the  world... ... Disregard and contempt for human rights have resulted in barbarous acts which have  outraged the conscience of mankind, and the advent of a world in which human beings  shall enjoy freedom of speech and belief and freedom from fear and want has been  proclaimed as the highest aspiration of the common people” Weakness of Bill of Rights • Applied to federal jurisdiction only o Provinces could still pass laws that infringed on civil rights • Judicial enforcement was inconsistent o They didn’t tell courts what they could do and what power they had o It didn’t provide guidance to court of what their roles were o Courts were confused whether they were supreme or parliament was • Could be amended fairly easily o It wasn’t a constitutional document, governments could change it without  a lot of difficulty • Legislation that overrode the Bill could still be passes as long as government  acknowledged this • Was superseded by the War Measures Act o Parliament could invoke act to suspend civil liberties o Only to be used in times of War to protect peace, order and welfare o It was repealed in 1988 and doesn’t exist anymore o It was replaced with the emergencies act, unlike the war measures act  those temporary laws have to conform with the charter o It was used three times; in the 1  and 2  war and the October Crisis “Just Watch Me” • October Crisis (1970) o Kidnapping of Cross and Laporte by extremist FLQ • War Measures Act in invoked • Police and army patrol streets • Wide powers of arrest and detention o Suspension of civil liberties o Non­violent Quebec separatists were partly targeted Charter of Rights (Points taken away from its Image)  • Our first Canadian font is Cartier, which is what the charter is written in • Prime minister Trudeau wanted a charter that entrenched bilingualism and  multiculturalism to spread
More Less

Related notes for POL214Y5

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.

Submit