Class Notes (836,367)
Canada (509,757)
POL214Y5 (144)
Lecture 8

POL214-Lecture 8.docx

5 Pages
121 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POL214Y5
Professor
Erin Tolley
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 8: The Executive  Part 2 Structure of Parliament • The Canadian legislation is called the crown (really abstract) think about the  crown as the state (institutions and laws) queen as the physical embodiment of  that state and governor general is the representative of the queen • Queen is a mentor of both the executive and legislative branch A friendly dictatorship? “The Canadian Prime Minister is more powerful within this system than any  democratically elected leader in other advanced industrial countries” (Simpson 2001,4) • We live in a dictatorship where the prime minster exercise so much power that  may not be evil but may also not be on a democratic end for the ways in which  our constitutions was analyzed • He made this argument against Jean Cretian • We say the Prime Minister powers increased in the 1970’s when Pierre Trudeau  was in power. He shifted the power and centralized it • This refers to the Prime Minsters power in the domestic stage.  • Factors that affect this: o One party tends to be dominant for a considerable amount of time, even  though we have multiple different parties. This allows for an  institutionalized of power and a centralization of power where these  people can really take hold and have an impact. o Media spotlight has tended to turn its attention towards the prime minister.  Many people would not recognize other people apart of the government o Traditionally the Prime Minister and cabinet had to be responsible to  government but now due to the prorogation they have found a way to  work around it. Since this is an unwritten rule there is not much you can  do about it (it’s a constitutional convention). Prorogation is now used in  ways to avoid a motion of non­confidence. So what kind of power does the Prime Minister have? • Executive powers • Power over: o Cabinet o Bureaucracy o Parliament o Party and electorate o Media • In theory the House of Commons, the courts, oppositions from other parties, the  provinces, the threat of an election, tradition in the sense of constitutional  conventions and the governor general could act as a check and go against the  prime ministers. Executive powers • Prime minister exercises the Governor General’s executive powers o Summoning and dissolving parliament o Organizing government o Calling election o Making appointments o Negotiation treaties o Declaring war and peace • Although we have a dual executive and the governor general in theory has  powers, the prime minister executes those powers. Power over cabinet • The prime minister: o Selects cabinet ministers and assigns portfolios (higher and fires)  He has an information monopoly   Prime minster has final say in votes on cabinet, he can manipulate  the outcome by structuring the discussion or choosing the final  outcome o Dismisses cabinet ministers  o Determines the legislative agenda o Chairs cabinet meetings  Prime ministers sets the agenda  Summarizes decisions Power over the bureaucracy • The prime minister can: o Create new department o Reorganize existing departments  Alter mandates and also decide what they can do  They created public safety and emergency preparedness after 9/11.  It set up to mirror the department of home land security in the  states o Choose the top civil servants (and fire them) o Set policy direction  People to keep an eye on what the government is doing Power over Parliament • Crown o Prime minister chooses the Governor General o Prime minster exercises executive powers • House of commons o Prime minister chairs caucus meetings  o Prime minister exercises party disciplines o Prime minster sets agenda of house • Senate o Prime minister appoints senators Power over the party and electorate • Controls extra­parliamentary party o Post victory allegiances o Patronage appointments • Decided when to call elections o
More Less

Related notes for POL214Y5

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit