Class Notes (835,638)
Canada (509,305)
POL214Y5 (144)
Lecture 11

POL214-Lecture 11.docx

6 Pages
127 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POL214Y5
Professor
Erin Tolley
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 11: The Senate Double Dipping: obtaining an income from two different sources Outline • Senate appointments • The senate in theory • The senate in practice • The scandal • Sensate reform options Background Knowledge • Parliament includes: the queen and the crown, the House of Commons and the  senate • Senate isn’t elected they’re appointed – the House of Commons and senate form  the legislative breach • The job of the Senate is to look at legislation and pass legislation Senate Appointments: Then • Appointed by PM o Patronage and partisanship o Property o Requirement: o In 1867 you had to own 4000 of property in that province that you are  appointed in, which is about $200,000 dollars now o Only men until 1929  Women were excluded on the grounds that they weren’t  considered persons o Age requirement (30) o Life­long appointment  At the time until you voluntarily retired or died you stayed in the  Senate • The “famous five” status on Parliament Hill, celebrating the 1929 JCPC decision  recognizing women as person under the law.  o Group of women from Alberta who challenged the definition of persons  in court. They said it should include not only men but also women. The  judicial court agreed with them and said women could if the government  wished to do so could be considered persons under law. o The first woman was appointed in 1930 Senate Appointments: Now • Appointed by PM o Mandatory retirement at age 75 o Patronage and partisanship o Typically represent corporate elite  Own businesses, serve on corporate boards  Are well known successful people in everyday lives and in their  businesses on the side  Senators can hold jobs on corporate boards while serving the  Senate yet sometimes cant serve legislation based on ones with  personal interests  They have to declare that there isn’t a conflict of interest so that  they can serve that particular board  No senators from the NDP – the people on the left have been  opposed to serving the senate  The people of the left don’t serve the elite o Diversity in representation  A senator from each province, but in practice it’s a party affiliation Representation in the Senate • 13.6% of Harper’s senate appointments have been visible minority Canadians • He also appointed the first aboriginal senators • Women only make about 36% of Senate seats which is more than the House of  Commons • Women and minorities are under represented in the House of Commons which is  why the Senate has taken on this role • The senate’s job is to act as a chain of chamber of sober second thought. It goes  through the House of Commons goes through something it would like to pass 3  times and then it could come to the Senate and be questioned. In almost rare cases  does the Senate not pass something the House of Commons has passed. A  legislation would not come onto affect until both parties agrees on it. • The government wants to have their own members of parties in the senate so that  the senate doesn’t make changes to decisions made in the House of Commons. • They can fill a buster, which is when elected officials speak non stop to delay a  vote on legislation.  The Senate in Theory • Powerful o Can introduce legislation o Legislatives veto • Useful • The Senate is seen as a check on the House of Commons. It wasn’t initially  created to be a partisan chamber but that didn’t play out.  o Sober second thought  Correct or amend legislation as necessary  Some people question whether the senate continued to fulfill that  role o Regional representation  When it was first created there were only 4 provinces which were  divided into regions with each reason have an equal numbers of  Senators  The idea initially was each region would be represented equally  Now we have more provinces and the equal regional representation  doesn’t hold  The Senate in Practice: Power • Not so powerful occasionally pesky o Example: PM Mulroney and the GST (Goods and Services Tax) o Appointed 8 extra senators  They rarely exercise powers in ter
More Less

Related notes for POL214Y5

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit